Masonian Times (MI, 1845)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Unknown

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1845

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Dacre, H.J.  (not sure if this name is the editor)

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:         

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Manuscript Holdings,  Bentley Historical Library, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

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Flumgudgeon Gazette and Bumble Bee Budget (OR, 1845)

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Flumgudgeon Gazette & Bumble Bee Budget (OR, 1845)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Oregon City, Oregon Territory

Frequency:  Bi-weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Summer, 1845; total of eight issues

Size and Format:  Ink on foolscap; single column; twelve copies of each issue; number eight contains 13 pages

Editor/Publisher:  “Curltail Coon,” aka Charles Pickett (1845)

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

The Flumgudgeon Gazette and Bumble Bee Budget was the first publication in the Oregon Territory and appeared during the meeting of the Legislative Committee in 1845.  The paper was subtitled, “A Newspaper of the Salmagundi Order, Devoted to Scratching and Stinging the Follies of the Times.”  According to Brier, Picket published eight issues of the paper and made about 12 copies of each number.  The paper was mainly a diatribe against the Legislative Committee of the Provisional Government of Oregon.  The paper consisted primarily of satire designed to sting the legislators.  Powell claims the paper “performed a useful service in pioneer Oregon by informing the settlers of the early activities of their government and by giving voice to opinions other than those of the legislators.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Warren J. Brier, “A History of Newspapers in the Pacific Northwest, 1846-1896,” unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Iowa, Feb. 1957, pp. 5-10, 105-107; Warren J. Brier, “The ‘Flumgudgeon Gazette and Bumble Bee Budget,'” Journalism Quarterly, 36 (Summer 1959), 317-320; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 131; Bob Karolevitz, “Pen and Ink Newspapers of the Old West,” Frontier Times, 44:2 (Feb.-March 1970), 31; Sidney Warren, Farthest Frontier:  The Pacific Northwest (New York:  Macmillan Co, 1949), 190-191; Lawrence Clark Powell, “Flumgudgeon Gazette in 1845 Antedated the Spectator,” Oregon Historical Quarterly, XLI:2 (June, 1940), 203-207; Lawrence Clark Powell, Philosopher Pickett (Berkeley:  University of California Press, 1942), 12; Frederic Hudson, Journalism in the United States, From 1690 to 1872 (New York:  Harper and Bros., 1873), 590

Locations:  Vol.1, No. 8, Aug. 20, 1845 only:  OreHiSoc-Portland; reproduction of Vol.1, No. 8, Aug. 20, 1845 in Karolevitz (1970), p. 31; Karolevitz (1969), p. 131.

Atlantian Journal (IN, 1845-1848)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Terre Haute, Indiana

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Three volumes, 1845-1848

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  The Terre Haute Atlantian Literati

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description & Notes:

The journal consists of writings on Indiana and midwestern history, travel accounts, and essays on literary and social topics.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  William Henry Smith Memorial Library, Indiana Historical Society, Indianapolis, IN

Athabasca Journal and English River Inquirer (SK, 1845)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Bear Island Lake, on the upper Churchill (or English) River north of Lac la Ronge, Saskatchewan

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  August 8, 1845

Size and Format:  11 pages, foolscap

Editor/Publisher:  Bernard Rogan Ross

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

According to The Beaver magazine, Bernard Rogan Ross tried to relieve the monotony of a trip by York boat over the regular route of the old fur trade by writing a newspaper, couched in the journalistic style of the period, about the doings of the people of his brigade of three boads proceeding slowly up the Churchill or English River towards Methy Passage.  Although his writing is extremely fine and small, the issue of Aug. 8, 1845, of this Athabasca Journal and English River Inquirer, as he called it, took up 11 closely-written pages of foolscap.  It was preserved by his daughter, (Mrs. George A. Graham) and later published in part of the Fort William Daily Times-Journal of Dec. 27, 1928.

The paper is dated at Bear Island Lake, on the upper Churchill north of Lac la Ronge, in what is now Saskatchewan, and carries the announcement that the next issue would be published the following week at Ile a la Crosse.  The price is stated to be six pence per customer payable, not in cash, but in Saskatchewan pemmican.

The first page is devoted to “Shipping Intelligence,” and included news of ship arrivals and gossip about the Dutchess of Kent.  During this period, the Oregon boundary question was hot news.  As this paper was written, however, the issue had been settled two months earlier.  Without this knowledge, Ross wrote that he suspected the Americans would start a war over the issue.  He warned the southerners that Canada could not only defend itself, but could “lay waste the North-western States with fire and sword, nor cease until the British flag waved triumphantly thoughout the Union.”

Chief Trader Bernard R. Ross, F.R.G.S., was only 18 years old when he wrote this account, and this was apparently his first trip west.  He became a well known naturalist (Ross’s Goose), an anthropologist, and a prolific contributor to the British Museum and Smithsonian Institution.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Bernard Rogan Ross, “Fur Trade Gossip Sheet,” The Beaver:  Magazine of the North (Spring 1955)

Locations:  Cited in the Fort William Daily Times-Journal, Dec. 27, 1928; location of copy mentioned in The Beaver preserved by Ross’s daughter is unknown


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