The Prisoner Vidette (IL, 1864)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Camp Douglas (Prisoner of War Camp), Cook County, IL

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, after January 1864

Size and Format:  Four pages

Editor/Publisher:  Confederate Prisoners of War

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Camp Douglas, named after Stephen Douglas who owned the property, was located on the west side of Cottage Grove Avenue between 31st and 33rd streets in Chicago. In 1861, it was designed for recruiting and training Union soldiers, but after the capture of Fort Donelson in 1862, it became a prison camp for approximately 7,000 Confederate prisoners. The manuscript paper contains camp gossip, editorials, news from home, poetry, and advertisements. The “Prospectus” (page 1) states, “Feeling the want of a literary sheet of some discription [sic], in our midst, we have at length concluded to place before the public of Camp Douglas a spicy little paper, The Prisoner Vidette.”

The extant manuscript the Chicago Public Library Collection was restored at the Document Conservation Center, Atlanta, in 1976.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Mabel McIlvaine, ed., “History of Camp Douglas” in Reminiscenes of Chicago During the Civil War (Chicago, 1914), pp. 161-194; Thomas A. Orlando and Marie Gecik, compilers, Treasures of the Chicago Public Library (Chicago, 1977), Item 154, pp. 77-78

Locations: Grand Army Hall and Memorial Association Collection, Chicago Public Library.

The Prison Times (DE, 1865)

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Prison Times, DE, 1865; Image Source: Library of Congress; images of four pages at the New York Historical Society website

Place of Publication:  Fort Delaware, a Union prison camp holding Confederate officer prisoners, located on Pea Patch Island where the Delaware River merges into Delaware Bay, just south of New Castle, DE

Frequency:  Four extant copies (according to the NY Historical Society [with thanks to Joseph Ditta; see comments below; updated 9-24-12)

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.  1, No. 1, April  8, 1865

Size and Format:  See image below

Editor/Publisher:  J.W. Hibbs, Capt. 13th Va. Inf.was the publisher.  Proprietors and editors were George S. Thomas, Capt. 6thGa., Div. 24; W.H. Bennett, Capt. & A.C.S., Div. 24; and A. Harris, Lt. 3rdFla., Div. 28.

Title Changes and Continuation:  See The Stonewall Register

General Description and Notes:

Evidently there are three extant copies of the same issue, one in Savannah, Georgia, Charleston, South Carolina, and the other in Buffalo, NY.  The paper contains editorials, announcements, advertisements, poetry, barracks directory, Christian Association Directory, notices of clubs, and prison news notes.  The NY letter says, “As General Lee surrendered to General Grant on the 9th, this [April 8] issue may well have been the sole issue.”

In a letter from William H. Loos, Curator, Rare Book Room, Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, NY, dated July 14, 1993, Loos states that he found an extant copy of The Prison Times in “an old portfolio of loose single issues of early American newspapers that we have had for many years and which I had not had occasion to consult in nearly twenty years.” Two representatives from the New York State Library, who were working on the state’s portion of the national newspaper project, came to the Buffalo library to research their collection. “When I reviewed this portfolio before one of the researchers recorded its contents,” Loos wrote, “I was surprised to find a handwritten newspaper.”

According to Loos,

“The newspaper is vol. 1, no. 1 of the Prison Times issued at Fort Delaware in 1865. On page two, the date April 8th appears. As General Lee surrendered to General Grant on the 9th, this may well have been the sole issue. Fort Delaware was a prison camp for Confederate officers. The fort was located on Pea Patch Island where the Delaware River merges into Delaware Bay, just south of New Castle, Delaware.”

According to the South Carolina Historical Society records, P.A. McMichael raised a Confederate volunteer company that became Company G of the Twentieth South Carolina Infantry. He served in the Charleston, South Carolina area (1861-1863) mainly around Sullivan’s Island, and in Virginia, where he participated in the battle of Cold Harbor and was promoted to Lt. Col of the 20th Regiment. He was captured at Cedar Creek and taken to Fort Delaware.  His collection includes the handwritten newspaper, Prison Times (vol. 1, no. 1) for prisoners at Fort Delaware, Del. The South Carolina Historical Society catalog says the paper contains “advertisements for tailoring, barbering, music, religious assistance, debate and chess clubs with poetry, barracks directory, and descriptions and comments on prison life.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:

Links: New York Historical SocetyGeorgia Historical Society catalog entry for The Prison Times;  South Carolina Historical Society, Paul A. McMichael holdings; see also  http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn93063825/

Locations:  Prison Times, Misc. Fort Delaware: NYUGB12021269-A, New York Historical Society, with images of four pages; Prison Times, MS 638, Georgia Historical Society, Savannah, Georgia; and Buffalo and Erie County Public Library, Buffalo, NY; and Prison Times in Paul Agalus McMichael (1820-1869),  correspondence and diary, 1861-1865 (1073.00),  South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, SC.

The Prince Albert Critic (NWT, 1889)

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Prince Albert Critic (SK, 1889)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Prince Albert, North West Territories, Canada

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: 21 Feb.-21 March, 1889 (Vol. 1, No. 5)

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Alexander Stewart

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Paper contains numerous advertisements and “Telegraphic News” on page one; subscription terms, church service times, editorials on “Compulsory Education”  and “The Town Council and the Railway Question” on page two; correspondence and news briefs on page three; and more telegraphic news, a report on the “Supreme Court,” a “Parliamentary Note” report, a note about the Critic taken from the Regina Journal on page four.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  National Library of Canada, Ottawa, ON; Saskatchewan Archives Board, University of Regina, Regina, SK

Pownal Argus (PEI, 1885)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Pownal, Prince Edward Island, Canada

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  Oct. 22-Nov. 19, 1885

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations: Unknown

The Potters Wheel (MO, 1904-1907)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: St. Louis, MO

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  15 issues, 1904-1907

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  The Potters, a group of St. Louis women artists and writers who issued this monthly magazine

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

“A single copy of the magazine was hand-lettered and hand-illustrated by the Potters. It contained a variety of artistic output, including poetry and prose, photographs, calligraphy artwork, and needlework.  Comprised of young women in their late teens and early twenties, the Potters included poet Sara Teasdale, artists Caroline Risque and Petronelle Sombart, photographers Grace and Williamina Parrish, and writers Vine Colby, Inez Dutro, Celia Harris, Edna Wahlert and Guida Richey.  Their mentor, Lillie Rose Ernst, was a botany teacher at Central High School [and later an administrator with the St. Louis Public School System], and she alternately encouraged and challenged them.  The Potters went their various ways after 1907, some of them to marry, others for further study or to actively pursue careers in distant places.

The collection contains poems, short stories, watercolor prints, photographs–mostly portraits, various hand-painted designs, plays, fabric covered designs, and photographs of sculptures.

Information Sources:                   

Bibliography: None

Locations:  The Potters Wheel Collection, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO; three issues  in the Yale University Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New Haven,CT

Potosi Nix Cum Rouscht (NV, 1861)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Potosi, Nevada (then in northwest New Mexico Territory)

Frequency:  Not more than one or two issues

Volume and Issue Data:  Late Feb. 1861

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Capt. J.E. Stevens, aka “Man about the Mill”

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Lingenfelter and Gash, editor Stevens started this manuscript paper in late Feb. 1861 so as “not to be outdone by Talbott’s Miner’s Voice.”  Stevens was the president of the Colorado Mining Company and founder of Potosi.  The editor said the paper was “printed” at Las Vegas station and “published at Potosi.”  The paper probably did not last beyond the first issue.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 119; Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 67; Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984), p. 171.

Locations:  No issues located, but Feb. 19, 1861 issue (Vol. 1, No. 1) quoted in Los Angeles Star, March 9, 1861.

Port Sanilac Times, (MI, 1857-1883)

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See Bark Shanty Times (MI, 1857-1883)

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