Wawa, Kamloops (BC, 1891-1905)

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Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

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Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, May 2, 1891-Vol.14, No. 1, 1905; Nos. 1-213

Size and Format:  Text largely in shorthand of Chinook jargon; three columns; small format; copies mimeographed

Editor/Publisher:  Father LeJeune

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905 )

This newspaper was published in Kamloops, British Columbia between 1891 and 1905 in a Chinook script developed by Father LeJeune.  The paper was handwritten then mimeographed.

The first page’s three columns are each written in a different script.  The first transliterates the Chinookan script of column two and column three translates both into English.  Column three reads:

“This paper is named Kamloops Wawa.  It is born just now.  It wants to appear and speak every week, to all who want to learn to write fast.  No matter if they be white men.”

[Note: The box containing the Kamloops Wawa includes separately paged inserts in various languages with duplicate numbering.  Also includes:  The Kamloops phonographer, no. 4 (Oct. 1892); circular (2 pp.):  Coldwater, Aug. 24, 1892; printed letter dated April 1, 1892 in French.  Five unidentified fragments;  2 pp. leaflet, at head of paper, the Kamloops Wawa symbols, on back, “the Duployan phonetic alphabet complete”; 2 copies (4 pp.) of the Chinook shorthand; pp. 49-80 ith chapter headings, “Stations of the Cross”,  “Preparation for confession”, “Act of miracle,” “Monseigneur Laurence”, “Fruitless temptation,” etc.]

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  James C. Pillings, Bibliography of the Chinookan Languages, Bulletin 15 (Washington, D.C.:  Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethnology, 1893), pp. 46-47; Pillings, Bibliography of the Salishan Language, Bulletin 16 (Washington, D.C.:  Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethnology, 1893), p. 38.

Locations:  McFarlin Library, Special Collections, University of Tulsa

Hazelton Queek (BC, 1880-1881)

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Hazelton Queek (BC, 1881)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hazelton (Caledonia?), British Columbia, Canada

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1880-1881

Size and Format: Unknown (see image)

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

A typewritten memo with the Queek in the BC Archives by Mrs. H.K. Andrews (or “Miss Woods”, whose name is scratched out) reads,

“In the year 1880, I went North with my brother to stay with our people the Tomlinsons. My brother to assist in farm and agricultural work which Mr. Tomlinson the missionary was starting, to help the Indians improve their mode of life. And had settled a little place called Ankihtlast–about 150 miles from the Coast and 20 miles from Hazelton, near the head of Navigation on the Skeena. I went to try and help my sister with the children (four in number). In the year of 80 & 81 Bp. and Mrs. Ridley having been sent by the C.F.S. to be head of the Missions were living at what we called ‘The Forks’ (the junction of the Bulkley and Skeena), now I believe called Old Hazelton. Wishing to do all possible to help the whites, Mrs. Ridley started what she called pleasant evenings on every Tuesday and her house was open house specially for the men who came out from Omineca. An evening of readings, music and general social intercourse.  This social evening developed into a desire for a weekly paper, both the Bp. and Mrs. R. were talented & had taken many sketches locally. Mrs. R. and I going out together, sketching up the Haguilket Valley. There was no news coming in for the winter months from the outside world, we were absolutely cut off till spring would come. So everyone was expected to help in gathering items of interest, a riddle, a story, anything. My brother sent weather readings from our mission station. I contributed a few sketches, for our paper was an illustrated one, and we looked forward to receiving it on Saturday. The Bp. wrote out and transferred it on a gelatine press, sufficient numbers for the regular customers–about 10 or 12 I suppose; the Hankins, ourselves, & the miners. “

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations: British Columbia Archives and Records Services, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Emigrant Soldiers Gazette and Cape Horn Chronicle (ENG-BC, 1858-1859)

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Emigrant Soldiers Gazette & Cape Horn Chronicle (Eng-BC, 1858-1859)

Place of Publication:  “Editor’s office, Starboard Front Cabin, ‘Thames City,'” en route from Gravesend, England to Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada

Frequency:  Weekly (“read aloud each Saturday night, the day of publication, by the commanding officer, Capt. H.R. Luard, R.E.”)

Volume and Issue Data:  17 numbers issued:  No. 1, Nov. 6, 1858 to No. 17, April 2, 1859; not published during three week layover at Falkland Islands

Size and Format:  10.75 x 18 inches; pre-printed title/masthead; pen and ink

Editor/Publisher:  Second Corporal Charles Sinnett, R.E., assisted by Lt. H.S. Palmer, R.E.

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

Contains a news section, natural history of the voyage, correspondence, conundrums, naval and military intelligence, songs, poetry, jokes, advertisements, foreign intelligence and market intelligence.

The Emigrant Soldiers Gazette and Cape Horn Chronicle was published originally in manuscript form on board the ship “Thames City,” which sailed from Gravesend, England, on October 10, 1858 and reached Esquimalt, Vancouver Island, British Columbia on April 12, 1859.  Aboard the ship was a detachment of Royal Engineers selected for service in B.C.

The paper was edited by Second Corporal Charles Sinnett, R.E., and assisted by Lt. H.S. Palmer, R.E.  Each Saturday night, the day of publication, the paper was read aloud by the ship’s commanding officer, Captain H.R. Luard, R.E.

The first issue explained that as one of the ways to avoid monotony and “keep a merry heart,”

[A] thoughtful friend on shore, whose name should be held in honour among us, has provided us with the means of establishing a small Newspaper, to be kept up by our own contributions.  Let us set about it with good will and heartiness.  Some little amusement and instruction will be sure to follow.  Any trifling matter recorded now will be a pleasure to refer to hereafter as a memorial of the peaceful and happy days of our voyage.

The first issue also published a notice “To Correspondents,” as a guide to contributors:

1.  In future, contributions of Leading Articles on any subject are requested to send them in to the Editor by noon every Thursday, and all other contributions should be sent in by 8 o’clock the same evening, to give ample time for publishing the paper.

2.  Any person willing to answer letter addressed “To the Editor,” are invited to do so, addressing their answers in the same manner.

3.  The answers to Charades and Conundrums will be published the Saturday after they appear, and any person guessing an answer, may learn on application to the Editor or Sub-Editor if he is right or wrong.  But is hoped correct guessers will keep their secret.

The paper maintained a regular front page news section and other regular sections, such as “Natural History of the Voyage,” “Correspondence,” “Conundrums,” “Naval and Military Intelligence,” “Songs and Poetry,” “Jokes,” “Foreign Intelligence,” “Market Intelligence,” and “Advertisements.”

The printed edition of the paper included a map detailing the ship’s route and marking its locations on the dates of publication.

After the arrival of the Thames City at New Westminster, B.C., the men aboard the ship paid to have the paper printed as a souvenir of their voyage.  The “British Columbian” newspaper in New Westminster printed the paper from the manuscript originals.

In Volume One–”To the correspondents  1. In the future, contributors of Lending Articles on any subject are requested to send them in to the editor by noon every Thursday, and al other contributions should be sent in by eight o’clock the same evening, to give ample time for publishing the paper.  2. Any person willing to answer letters addressed “To the Editor,” are invited to do so, addressing their answers in the same manner.  3. The answers to the Charades and Conundrums will be published the Saturday after they appear, and any person guessing an answer may learn on application to the Editor or Sub-Editor if he is right or wrong.  But it is hoped correct guessers will keep their secret.”

Preface to the published collection:  [Printed by R. Wolfenden, 1907]

“The ESGCHC was published originally in manuscript form, on board the ship “Thomas City,” which was sailed from Gravesend on the 10th of October, 1858, and reached Esquimalt, V. I. on the 12th April, 1859, having on board a Detachment of Royal Engineers selected for service in B.C.  The paper was edited by Second-Corporal, Charles Sinnett, R.G., assisted by Lt. H. S. Palmer, R.G.  and was read aloud each Saturday night, the day of publication, by the commanding officer, Captain H.R. Luard, R.G.  After the arrival of the Detachment of the camp, New Westminster, it was thought advisable to have this most interesting journal printed for distribution amongst the members of the Detachment.  This was done, at the men’s expense, at the office of the “British Columbia,” New Westminster, by the late John Robson.

From No. 1 [11/6/58]–p.1  “As one means towards this desired end [to avoid monotony and keep a merry heart], a thoughtful friend on shore, whose name should be held in honour among us, has provided us with a means of establishing a small Newspaper, to be kept up by our own contributors Let us set about it with good will and heartiness.  Some little amusement and instruction will be sure to follow. Any trifling matter recorded now will be a pleasure to refer to hereafter as a memorial of the peaceful and happy days of our voyage.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Emigrant Soldiers Gazette and Cape Horn Chronicle (Printed by R. Wolfenden, 1907); Roy Atwood, “Shipboard News: Nineteenth Century Handwritten Periodicals at Sea,” Paper Presentation to the History Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Convention, Chicago, IL, 1997; Reprint, New York Public Library.

Locations:  British Columbia Archives and Records Services, Victoria, British Columbia; (printed edition) The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, California; New York Public Library, New York.

Clanwilliam Hustler (BC, 1894)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: British Columbia, Canada

Frequency:  One copy only

Volume and Issue Data:  1894

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  British Columbia Archives and Records Services, Victoria, British Columbia

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