The New Moon (MO, 1842)

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The New Moon, MO, 1842

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Jefferson City or Arrow Rock, MO

Frequency: Unknown (one issue?)

Volume and Issue Data: February 23, 1842

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

According to the Missouri Historical Society, “The New Moon was a mock newspaper sent to Miss Missouri I. Ewing of Jefferson City, MO, from an unknown ‘publisher.’  A unique issue, it provides an entertaining news account of an excursion from Jefferson City to a point new [sic] Arrow Rock, MO, for a country wedding.

According to Jolliffe and Whitehouse, The New Moon “was probably not a continuing, circulated publication”  and “it appears that the entire issue satirizes a single event–a wedding.” They conclude that the paper was “a single copy of an amusing feminist newsletter.”

Information Sources:                           

Bibliography: Lee Jolliffe and Virginia Whitehouse, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Frontier? The Prevalence Problem, ” paper presented at the AEJMC History Division Mid-Year Meeting, Columbia, MO, 1994.

Locations:  Edwards Family Papers, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

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Litte Joker (SK, 1888 )

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada

Frequency:

Volume and Issue Data:  Twelve issues; June-Dec. 1888

Size and Format:  11 x 17 inches

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Saskatchewan Archives Board has 70 pp. of this manuscript newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Saskatchewan Archives Board, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

Litte Joker (SK, 1888)

Little Joker (SK, )

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

Light Wood Knot Herald and Daily Expositor (SC, 1837-1838)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Light Wood Knot, S.C. (near Columbia)

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1837-1838

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Martha Warrington Nutting Stratton (1814-1890), Jacob Levin, Thomas Seibels

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

 “A facetious newspaper containing parodies, humorous news articles, poems, advertisements, obituaries, and sketches.”  Light Wood Knot Springs was located near Columbia and was frequented by planters and their families.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

The Gas Light (MO, 1850)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Keytesville, MO

Frequency:  Unknown, published sporadically for nearly a year

Volume and Issue Data: Started June 1850

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  “Timothy Timbertoes” and “Samuel Sugarstick” (pseudonyms)

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

 According to the History of Howard and Chariton Counties, the paper professed to be “neutral in religion and politics.” The writers made fun of local leaders and gave satirical accounts of quilting parties, shooting matches and weddings.

According to Jolliffe and Whitehouse, “This publication cannot be named a ‘newspaper,’ given the lack of information about it.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Lee Jolliffe and Virginia Whitehouse, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Frontier? The Prevalence Problem, ” paper presented at the AEJMC History Division Mid-Year Meeting, Columbia, MO, 1994; History of Howard and Chariton Counties, Missouri (St. Louis: National Historical Company, 1883), p. 511.

Locations:  None

Forest Grove Observer or Our Local and Amherstburgh Gazette (ON, 1856)

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Forest Grove Observer (ON, 1856)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Near Amherstburgh, Ontario, Canada

Frequency:  “After due notice given to subscribers”

Volume and Issue Data:  Wednesday evening, May 14, 1856

Size and Format:  3 column pages, 4 pages

Editor/Publisher:  (looks like three names–can’t decifer)

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Forest Grove Observer (ON, 1856)

Located in a miscellaneous file along with

various other dated items in the John Macintosh Duff Collection, 1822-1870.  Seems to be completely tongue-in-cheek with business notices with heading “Miss Tallstory,” Miss Crusty,” etc. and including stories about chickens, cows, and pigs.  One heading under “Personal” is about the Governor and Family which is quite lengthy.

Forest Grove Observer (ON, 1856)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Archives, Call No. XR1 MS A210158,  Archival and Special Collections, University of Guelph Library, Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Forest Grove Observer (ON, 1856)

Flumgudgeon Gazette and Bumble Bee Budget (OR, 1845)

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Flumgudgeon Gazette & Bumble Bee Budget (OR, 1845)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Oregon City, Oregon Territory

Frequency:  Bi-weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Summer, 1845; total of eight issues

Size and Format:  Ink on foolscap; single column; twelve copies of each issue; number eight contains 13 pages

Editor/Publisher:  “Curltail Coon,” aka Charles Pickett (1845)

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

The Flumgudgeon Gazette and Bumble Bee Budget was the first publication in the Oregon Territory and appeared during the meeting of the Legislative Committee in 1845.  The paper was subtitled, “A Newspaper of the Salmagundi Order, Devoted to Scratching and Stinging the Follies of the Times.”  According to Brier, Picket published eight issues of the paper and made about 12 copies of each number.  The paper was mainly a diatribe against the Legislative Committee of the Provisional Government of Oregon.  The paper consisted primarily of satire designed to sting the legislators.  Powell claims the paper “performed a useful service in pioneer Oregon by informing the settlers of the early activities of their government and by giving voice to opinions other than those of the legislators.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Warren J. Brier, “A History of Newspapers in the Pacific Northwest, 1846-1896,” unpublished Ph.D. thesis, University of Iowa, Feb. 1957, pp. 5-10, 105-107; Warren J. Brier, “The ‘Flumgudgeon Gazette and Bumble Bee Budget,'” Journalism Quarterly, 36 (Summer 1959), 317-320; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 131; Bob Karolevitz, “Pen and Ink Newspapers of the Old West,” Frontier Times, 44:2 (Feb.-March 1970), 31; Sidney Warren, Farthest Frontier:  The Pacific Northwest (New York:  Macmillan Co, 1949), 190-191; Lawrence Clark Powell, “Flumgudgeon Gazette in 1845 Antedated the Spectator,” Oregon Historical Quarterly, XLI:2 (June, 1940), 203-207; Lawrence Clark Powell, Philosopher Pickett (Berkeley:  University of California Press, 1942), 12; Frederic Hudson, Journalism in the United States, From 1690 to 1872 (New York:  Harper and Bros., 1873), 590

Locations:  Vol.1, No. 8, Aug. 20, 1845 only:  OreHiSoc-Portland; reproduction of Vol.1, No. 8, Aug. 20, 1845 in Karolevitz (1970), p. 31; Karolevitz (1969), p. 131.

The Cactus (UT, 1878?-1884)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Panguitch, Garfield County, Utah (1878? 1880?-1884)

Frequency:  Irregular, “when the spirit moved”

Volume and Issue Data:  Started 1878 or 1879 and published until about 1884

Size and Format:  8 x 10 inches, four pages

Editor/Publisher:  John M. Dunning, editor and publisher; James T. Daly, Sr., correspondent or writer

Title Changes and Continuation:  Garfield County News, The Recorder, The Register

General Description & Notes:

The paper was first called the Cactus, but the name was changed, possibly, to the Garfield County News, The Recorder, and/or The Register.  The paper was not issued regularly but “when the spirit moved.”

According to Alter, editor Dunning was said to have been a humorist and prepared his own jokes for fillers.  Many of his poems and other writings also appeared in the Cactus.  Says Alter, “It may have been a manuscript, pen-and-ink newspaper.”

Alter notes that “the Manti Home Sentinel mentions March 26, 1886 as being: ‘among our latest exchanges:’ though the echang practice was so universal it is more than likely the Register was just beginning when it received this notice.”

According Lucy Hatch, a member of the Panguitch Daughters of the Utah Pioneers, Dunning published the first newspaper in the town “from about 1880 to 1884” and that Daly was a correspondent or writer.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter,  Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah Historical Society, 1938), p. 180

Locations:  No issues located

See also the Panguitch Register

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