Wawa, Kamloops (BC, 1891-1905)

Leave a comment

See the Kamloops Wawa

Schoolcraft’s First Literary Magazine (MI, 1827)

Leave a comment

See The Muzzeniegun or Literary Voyager 

Neya Powagans (AB, 1991-present?)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Frequency: Bimonthly

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, February, 1992

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Geoff Burtonshaw (2324-3rd Ave. NW, Calgary)

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:          

This paper describes itself as a “Metis Newsletter.” According the Glenbow Museum, the editor, R. Geoffrey Burtonshaw, 1916- , was born on a farm near Valpoy, Manitoba. He moved to Calgary, Alberta in 1952 and worked as a carpenter until he retired in 1981. He subsequently became interested in Metis genealogy and collected a vast amount of information on the subject.

In the spring of 1991, he started Neya Powagans: The Metis Newsletter, a bi-monthly publication. He also assembles a Metis Researcher contact list and hosts Metis Research Nights at his house. At present he answers up to 700 written enquiries a year on Metis genealogy. He also volunteers on a regular basis at the Glenbow Museum, assisting Metis genealogy researchers.

Unclear from online sources and given the age of the editor if the paper is still published.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Link: Glenbow Museum, Calgary, AB

Locations: Neya Powagans: The Metis Newsletter, 2324 – 3rd Ave. N.W.  Calgary, AB, Canada; Manitoba Genealogical Society Library, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Glenbow Museum and Archives, Calgary, Alberta

The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (MI, 1827)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager (No. 4, Jan. 12, 1827-No. 11, ? 1827); The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager (No. 12, March 2, 1827); The Literary Voyager (No. 13, March 10, 1827-No. 14, April 11, 1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (No. 16, April 28, 1827)

Size and Format:  Averaged 23 pages per issue

Editor/Publisher:  Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1826-1827)

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager (1827); The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager (1827); The Literary Voyager (1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (1827); also cited as Schoolcraft’s First Literary Magazine

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager was a manuscript magazine devoted to the life, history, customs, tribal news of the Ojibwa Indians, as well as poetry, essays and information on western living and Mexican civilization.  This was the second of editor Schoolcraft’s three handwritten publications, the first being a literary magazine published from 1809 to 1818, and the third being The Bow and Arrow (1833).  The magazine circulated in Sault Ste. Marie, Detroit, New York and elsewhere.

Articles and other content were usually written by Schoolcraft and his wife.  Objiwa lore content was supplied by Mrs. Schoolcraft’s brother George Johnston and their mother, the daughter of Waub Ojeeg, a Ojibwa leader.  The reports published in The Muzzinyegun provided a basis for Schoolcraft’s later ethnological studies printed in Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Conditions, and Prospects of the indian Tribes of the United States (6 vols.; Philadelphia:  Lippincott, Grambo and Co., 1851-1857).

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Vernon Kinietz, “Schoolcraft’s Manuscript Magazines,”  Bibliographical Society of America Papers, 35 (April-June, 1941), 151-154; Philip P. Mason, “Introduction” and Notes, The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962); Philip P. Mason, ed., The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962); David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 265-266

Locations:  DLC; Danky and Hady; Reprint:  Philip P. Mason, ed., The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962)

Moqui Mission Messenger (AZ, 1894-1895)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Keams Canyon, Arizona

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan. 1894-Vol. 2, No. 4, April 1895

Size and Format:  One-column, two-page typed and mimeographed newsletter; after July, 1894:  four pages, two columns

Editor/Publisher:  Editor, Curtis P. Coe (1894-1895); anonymous editor (April 1894); Publisher, Moqui (Hopi) Reservation Faith Mission (before July, 1894), Otho F. Curtis, Chicago (after July, 1894)

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, the Moqui Mission Messenger was devoted to supporting editor Coe’s mission activities among the Hopi, Navajo and Arapahoe Indians at the Moqui Reservation (est. 1883).  The audience was friends and supporters of Coe’s mission work.  In the first issue, Coe asked readers to send grass roots, seeds and other plant stock to assist agricultural development.  The paper also contained accounts of the editor’s experiences with the Indians of the reservation and descriptions of native customs, habits and religion.  News of others involved with the mission, inspirational items, statistics on Arizona weather, census data on Indians and reservation financial information completed the general content of the issues.  The March and April, 1895 issues contained information about Alaska where Coe was to assume in May the position of superintendent of the Wood Island, Alaska, orphanage operated by the Women’s American Baptist Home Mission Society of Boston.  The editor announced that the Messenger would be discontinued after April, but that subscribers would receive the mission society’s publication, The Echo thereafter.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Frederick Webb Hodge, ed., Handbook of American Indians North of Mexico (Washington, D.C.:  Government Publishing Office, 1910), 2:233; David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 247-248

Locations:  DSI-BAE; ULS

The Little Chief (OK, 1899)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Darlington, Oklahoma

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan., 1899-Vol. 1, No. 3, Feb., 1899

Size and Format:  Four page, two columns, handwritten and mimeographed

Editor/Publisher:  Rev. W.M. Wellman, pastor, Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians Congregational Mission (1899)

Title Changes and Continuations:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, The Little Chief served as the mission’s promotional paper.  It was “devoted to the interests of the Christian work now being done among the Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians in general and to the Congregational Mission in particular.”  The paper contained appeals to donors outside the mission community and reported the “progress” of the Indians toward Christianity.  The paper also published tribal statistics, church news, inspirational statements and other news of activities related to the mission community.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian andAlaskaNative Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 247-248

Locations:  OkMuB-J

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

Leave a comment

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, May 2, 1891-Vol.14, No. 1, 1905; Nos. 1-213

Size and Format:  Text largely in shorthand of Chinook jargon; three columns; small format; copies mimeographed

Editor/Publisher:  Father LeJeune

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905 )

This newspaper was published in Kamloops, British Columbia between 1891 and 1905 in a Chinook script developed by Father LeJeune.  The paper was handwritten then mimeographed.

The first page’s three columns are each written in a different script.  The first transliterates the Chinookan script of column two and column three translates both into English.  Column three reads:

“This paper is named Kamloops Wawa.  It is born just now.  It wants to appear and speak every week, to all who want to learn to write fast.  No matter if they be white men.”

[Note: The box containing the Kamloops Wawa includes separately paged inserts in various languages with duplicate numbering.  Also includes:  The Kamloops phonographer, no. 4 (Oct. 1892); circular (2 pp.):  Coldwater, Aug. 24, 1892; printed letter dated April 1, 1892 in French.  Five unidentified fragments;  2 pp. leaflet, at head of paper, the Kamloops Wawa symbols, on back, “the Duployan phonetic alphabet complete”; 2 copies (4 pp.) of the Chinook shorthand; pp. 49-80 ith chapter headings, “Stations of the Cross”,  “Preparation for confession”, “Act of miracle,” “Monseigneur Laurence”, “Fruitless temptation,” etc.]

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  James C. Pillings, Bibliography of the Chinookan Languages, Bulletin 15 (Washington, D.C.:  Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethnology, 1893), pp. 46-47; Pillings, Bibliography of the Salishan Language, Bulletin 16 (Washington, D.C.:  Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethnology, 1893), p. 38.

Locations:  McFarlin Library, Special Collections, University of Tulsa

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: