Hazelton Queek (BC, 1880-1881)

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Hazelton Queek (BC, 1881)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hazelton (Caledonia?), British Columbia, Canada

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1880-1881

Size and Format: Unknown (see image)

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

A typewritten memo with the Queek in the BC Archives by Mrs. H.K. Andrews (or “Miss Woods”, whose name is scratched out) reads,

“In the year 1880, I went North with my brother to stay with our people the Tomlinsons. My brother to assist in farm and agricultural work which Mr. Tomlinson the missionary was starting, to help the Indians improve their mode of life. And had settled a little place called Ankihtlast–about 150 miles from the Coast and 20 miles from Hazelton, near the head of Navigation on the Skeena. I went to try and help my sister with the children (four in number). In the year of 80 & 81 Bp. and Mrs. Ridley having been sent by the C.F.S. to be head of the Missions were living at what we called ‘The Forks’ (the junction of the Bulkley and Skeena), now I believe called Old Hazelton. Wishing to do all possible to help the whites, Mrs. Ridley started what she called pleasant evenings on every Tuesday and her house was open house specially for the men who came out from Omineca. An evening of readings, music and general social intercourse.  This social evening developed into a desire for a weekly paper, both the Bp. and Mrs. R. were talented & had taken many sketches locally. Mrs. R. and I going out together, sketching up the Haguilket Valley. There was no news coming in for the winter months from the outside world, we were absolutely cut off till spring would come. So everyone was expected to help in gathering items of interest, a riddle, a story, anything. My brother sent weather readings from our mission station. I contributed a few sketches, for our paper was an illustrated one, and we looked forward to receiving it on Saturday. The Bp. wrote out and transferred it on a gelatine press, sufficient numbers for the regular customers–about 10 or 12 I suppose; the Hankins, ourselves, & the miners. “

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations: British Columbia Archives and Records Services, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

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Granite Times (NV, 1908)

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Granite Times (NV, 1908)

Place of Publication:  Granite (seven miles west of Schurz in present-day Mineral County), Nevada

Frequency:  Weekly?

Volume and Issue Data:  March 20, 1908-May 1, 1908

Size and Format:  Two-page, three columns; graphite pencil and blue pencil headlines, or black ink in longhand, with occasional shading and coloring with crayon

Editor/Publisher:  Frank Eugene Bugbee (elected to Nevada Assembly 1931, 1933, and 1937) (1908)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 131, identifies paper as the Granite News.

General Description & Notes:

The Granite Times, according to its 1908 Easter edition, was “Devoted to the Mining and Material Interests of Granite and the Mountain View District.”  According to Highton, the paper was regularly sold for $1, while the special the Easter edition was $5.  The paper included general local news, editorials and poetry.  Stories addressed such events as the completion of an automobile road between Granite and Schurz.  The Rawhide Rustler, April 18, 1908, reproduced a portion of the Granite Times:  “We reproduce . . . a section of the Times, a paper printed in lead pencil in the new town of Granite . . . .  It shows the usual progressiveness of new mining camps in Nevada.”  Lingenfelter and Gash speculate that the Times suspended publication with its seventh number on May 1, 1908.

Earl and Moody report that editor Bugbee was an Ohio native who taught school in Kansas before arriving in Nevada at the turn of the century.  He visited several mining towns before joining the rush to Granite and starting the Times.  Bugbee reported in one issue that he had ordered a carload of type to print his paper, but through an error he received a mess of tripe.  He offered “a bar of soap and a pound of tripe” to those who solicited others for new subscriptions to the Times.  Noted the editor, “Do not get discouraged because have not the tools and equipment you should have to run your lease.  The editor has only three lead pencils, but he gets out a paper every week.”

The two extant issue of the Granite Times at the Nevada Historical Society were donated by Bugbee in 1909.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Phillip I. Earl and Eric Moody, “Type, Tripe and the Granite Times,” Nevada Magazine, (May-June 1982), 17-18; Jake Highton, Nevada Newspaper Days:  A History of Journalism in the Silver State (Stockton, Calif.:  Heritage West Books, 1990), pp. 97;  Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 131 (identifies paper as the Granite News); Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984), 110.

Locations:  April 17, May 1, 1908:  NvHi (also on microfilm)

The Gold Canon Switch (NV, 1854)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Johntown, Utah Territory (four miles from what became Virginia City, Nevada)

Frequency:  Frequency disputed:  weekly, monthly or irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Ca. 1854

Size and Format:  “Often several sheets

Editor/Publisher:  Joseph Webb (1854)

Title Changes and Continuations:  Unknown

General Description & Notes:

According to De Quille and Highton, the Switch was “a spicy, handwritten weekly, ‘often several sheets,’ and passed from hand to hand.”  Lingenfelter and Gash say the paper was “probably issued monthly on letter paper and in a very small edition.”  De Quille claims the paper was widely circulated and read in Johntown when it was a major mining center.  The editor, Joe Webb, was a partner of “Old Virginy” Fenimore, for whom Virginia City was later named, according to Lingenfelter.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Bob Karolevitz, “Pen and Ink Newspapers of the Old West,” Frontier Times, 44:2 (Feb.-Mar., 1970), 31; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 114; Jake Highton, Nevada Newspaper Days:  A History of Journalism in the Silver State (Stockton, Calif.:  Heritage West Books, 1990), pp. 2; Dan De Quille, History of The Big Bonanza (New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1947), p. 11.

Index Sources:  Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 61; Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984).

Locations:  None

Esmeralda Sun (NV, 1872)

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See Pine Grove Burlesque

East of the Nevada; or The Miner’s Voice from Colorado (NV, 1861?)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Potosi, Nevada (then in northwest corner of New Mexico Territory)

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, Feb. 19, 1861-?

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  J. A. Talbott

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

According to Lingenfelter and Gash, editor J.A. Talbott, a former printer from Calaveras, came to Potosi following a silver discovery in 1860 without printing equipment.  Talbott justified publishing the East of the Nevada in its first issue:  “The manifold wants of our community rendering it necessary, owing to our isolated position, shut out from those sources of information and instruction that is as familiar as ‘household words’ in a settled community, renders it necessary to have a vehicle of thought amongst us by which an interchange of intelligence should be disseminated, questions discussed, wit circulated, and those precious gems preserved, without which ‘this world would be a void.’  For this end, and under our peculiar circumstances, our sheet is issued.”  The paper included a description of the principal mines of the district, a notice of the construction a theater and other local news.  The paper probably ran only a few issues, since the silver boom in Potosi was exhausted by October 1860, and Talbott joined the rush to Holcomb Valley.

The short life of the Miner’s Voice included competition with another local handwritten newspaper, the Potosi Nix Cum Rouscht, edited by Capt. J.E. Stevens, president of the Colorado Mining Company and founder of Potosi.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 119; Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 66-67; Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984), pp. 170-171.

Index Sources:  None

Locations:  No issues located, but Feb. 19, 1861 issue (Vol. 1, No. 1) quoted in Los Angeles Star, March 9, 1861.

Alaska Forum (AK, 1900-1906)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Rampart, Alaska (1900-1906)

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Sept. 27, 1900-Aug. 4, 1906

Size and Format:  8 x 10 inches; 2 cols; 4 pages

Editor/Publisher:  W.R. Edwards, editor (1900); J.B. Wingate, editor (1901-1906), manager (1900-1906)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Occasionally cited as the Rampart Forum

General Description & Notes:

According to McLean, Edwards promoted mining stock and Wingate was a mining recorder, mail carrier and miner then they started printing the Alaska Forum.  The partnership lasted only five months, with Edwards leaving to start the rival Rampart Miner six months later (The Miner last only about one year).  By July 1904, however, the local Episcopal Church recalled the iron printing press Wingate leased to publish the Forum, intending to lease to the promoters of a new paper, the Yukon Valley News.  Wingate fought the termination of his lease in court, but failed in his claims.  Wingate, without a press, tried to continue to publish the Forum to hold off his new rival.  Using old copies of his paper as a base, he pasted over the previous week’s news handwritten and typewritten material reproduced on a hectograph machine.  The absence of old copies of the Forum and the difficulties of publishing the manual versions led to a two-month suspension of the paper.  Wingate resumed printing the Forum when he had a new, foot-powered press built.  The shafts and fixtures of the press had been turned on a lathe run by dog-power, leading Wingate to refer to his printing plant as a “five-dog-power press.”

The Forum cost 25 cents and contained advertising, local news, especially stories related to mining, editorials, and occasional attacks on the Episcopal Church, judges (particularly Judge Wickersham, compiler of the Bibliography on Alaskan Literature, who had ruled against Wingate’s bid to keep the Episcopal press) and others Wingate opposed.  The tone of the paper became noticeably more strident after the loss of the printing press.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Dora E. McLean, Early Newspapers on the Upper Yukon Watershed:  1894-1907, unpublished M.A. thesis, University of Alaska, 1963, 44-56; James Wickersham, A Bibliography of Alaska Literature, 1724-1924 (Cordova, AK:  Cordova Daily Times Print, 1927), 251.

Locations:  AlHi-Juneau, AK

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