Our Port Folio (NJ, 1865-1885)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Lake Hopatcong, NJ, Public School

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1865-1885

Size and Format:  22 pages

Editor/Publisher:  “The young ladies of the public school in district no. 4.”

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

“The young ladies of the public school in district no. 4.” It is faintly written, in pencil or badly faded ink.

Information Sources:               

Bibliography: None

Locations:  New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, NJ

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The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (MI, 1827)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager (No. 4, Jan. 12, 1827-No. 11, ? 1827); The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager (No. 12, March 2, 1827); The Literary Voyager (No. 13, March 10, 1827-No. 14, April 11, 1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (No. 16, April 28, 1827)

Size and Format:  Averaged 23 pages per issue

Editor/Publisher:  Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1826-1827)

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager (1827); The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager (1827); The Literary Voyager (1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (1827); also cited as Schoolcraft’s First Literary Magazine

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager was a manuscript magazine devoted to the life, history, customs, tribal news of the Ojibwa Indians, as well as poetry, essays and information on western living and Mexican civilization.  This was the second of editor Schoolcraft’s three handwritten publications, the first being a literary magazine published from 1809 to 1818, and the third being The Bow and Arrow (1833).  The magazine circulated in Sault Ste. Marie, Detroit, New York and elsewhere.

Articles and other content were usually written by Schoolcraft and his wife.  Objiwa lore content was supplied by Mrs. Schoolcraft’s brother George Johnston and their mother, the daughter of Waub Ojeeg, a Ojibwa leader.  The reports published in The Muzzinyegun provided a basis for Schoolcraft’s later ethnological studies printed in Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Conditions, and Prospects of the indian Tribes of the United States (6 vols.; Philadelphia:  Lippincott, Grambo and Co., 1851-1857).

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Vernon Kinietz, “Schoolcraft’s Manuscript Magazines,”  Bibliographical Society of America Papers, 35 (April-June, 1941), 151-154; Philip P. Mason, “Introduction” and Notes, The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962); Philip P. Mason, ed., The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962); David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 265-266

Locations:  DLC; Danky and Hady; Reprint:  Philip P. Mason, ed., The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962)

The Morning Star (IL, 1858)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Greenfield, IL: Greenfield Seminary

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1858

Size and Format:  28 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Manuscripts (SC 529), Illinois State Historical Library, Old State Capitol, Springfield, IL

Little Monitor (NC, 1869)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Wilmington, NC

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1869

Size and Format:  Pen and ink journal

Editor/Publisher:  Edward A. Oldham

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

“In 1869 at Wilmington, N. C., so far as it has been possible to ascertain, occurred the initial awakening of amateur journalism in the South. At the age of nine, Edward A. Oldham, who was later to become a leading publisher of newspapers, weekly and daily, and a distinguished columnist and writer, produced his first effort in mimic journalism, a pen-and-ink journal, bearing the title of the Little Monitor, suggested by his having been selected as monitor in a private school, where he was among the youngest pupils. This little make-believe newspaper was issued often enough to intensify the young editor’s ambition to own a real printing press and to print a little paper. He had seen Benjamin S. Wood’s advertisement of the Novelty Press in his monthly copy of the St. Nicholas. In time he managed to earn money enough for the purchase of a press and type equipment, and in 1870 he published the Star of the South, four pages, each page 5 x 7 inches, printing one page at a time. This tiny journal set the pace for Southern boys, North Carolina boys particularly, and in that State there quickly followed the Boys’ Courier from New Born, with James M. Howard, Charles R. Thomas and Owen Guiort, as editors. The last named became a Superior Court judge, and Thomas rose to political prominence and became a Member of Congress from North Carolina for several terms, in the Nineties and later.” (The Early Pioneers of Amateur Journalism (Before 1876))

“WHAT HAS BEEN CHARACTERIZED as “The Mimic Press” had an early start in North Carolina. In 1869, at the age of nine, Edward A. Oldham, of Wilmington, is credited with producing the first “amateur newspaper” — the Little Monitor, a pen and ink folio, followed in 1873 by the Star of the South, miniature and type-set.” (Oldham, History of Early Amateur Journalism in North Carolina)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Links: Edward A. Oldham, History of Early Amateur Journalism in North Carolinahttp://www.thefossils.org/horvat/aj/states/NorthCarolina.htmThe Early Pioneers of Amateur Journalism (Before 1876)  http://www.thefossils.org/horvat/aj/pioneers.htm

Locations:  Unknown

The Levee Gazette (CT, 1828)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hartford, CT

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1828, 2 issues

Size and Format:  4 pages and 4 oversize pages

Editor/Publisher: Hartford Female Seminary

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Written by students at the Hartford Female Seminary founded by Catharine E. Beecher (1800-1878), sister of Harriet Beecher Stowe (1811-1896).

Information Sources:                     

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  The Stowe-Day Foundation, Hartford, CT

La Mignionette (IL, 1840)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Monticello College, Godfrey, Illinois

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1840, vol. I, No. 7 and submissions

Size and Format:  43 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Possibly later known as “Cobwebs”, 1862.  Both are publications of Monticello College.

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Monticello College Records (Box 9),  Manuscripts, Illinois State Historical Library, Old State Capitol, Springfield, IL

La Critique (MA, 1829)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Amherst College, Massachusetts

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1829, Vol. 1, nos. 2, 3, 4, 5

Size and Format:  16 pp. total

Editor/Publisher: Amherst College Students

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Publications holdings, Archives and Special Collections, Amherst College Library, Amherst, MA

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