The Grindstone Bee (SD, 1906)

Leave a comment

Grindstone Bee (SD, 1906)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Grindstone, South Dakota

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, April 1, 1906; “whenever we feel like it”

Size and Format:  11 x 14 in.; 4 pp.

Editor/Publisher:  Wm. Henry Bruno

Title Changes and Continuations:  NA

General Description and Notes:

Grindstone Bee (SD, 1906)

The date hints that it may be a spoof. Other indicators, such as the subscription rates on page 3 (“One year: cord of wood; six months: bushel of beans; three months: slab of bacon; one month: shave & hair cut”) and the motto,” Don’t kick if you happen to get stung,” also point toward an “April Fool’s” edition paper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Grindstone Bee (SD, 1906)

Locations: South Dakota Historical Society

Advertisements

Green Mountain Miscellany or Huntington Magazine (VT, 1834)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Huntington, Vermont

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: October 10, 1834

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  James Johns

Title Changes and Continuation: Huntington Magazine

General Description and Notes:

The earliest extant issue of a pen-printed amateur newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA

The Grasshopper (TX, 1866-1869)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Buffalo Springs, Texas

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Published sometime between 1866 and 1869.

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  H.H. McConnell

Title Changes and Continuation:  Same editor/publisher produced LITTLE JOKER at Jacksboro, Texas and the BIG INJUN at Fort Belknap, Texas.

General Description and Notes:

According to Whisenhunt, the Jacksboro area had no fewer than four newspapers between 1866 and 1869, although only one was printed.  The editor of all four was H.H. McConnell, a soldier first assigned to Jacksboro, Texas in 1866.  McConnell recounts his journalistic efforts and military experience on the Texas frontier in the Reconstruction period in his autobiography, Five Years a Cavalryman.

Shortly after he arrived in Jacksboro, McConnell and other soldiers published a weekly newspaper, LITTLE JOKER, on foolscap.  The paper circulated among the soldiers at Jacksboro.  The Jacksboro post was temporarily abandoned by the military, and the LITTLE JOKER “was ignominiously packed on a Quartermaster’s hourse and moved to Fort Belknap.”

At Fort Belknap soon issued another handwritten paper, BIG INJUN, intended for a military audience.  According to McConnell, “Here the genius of the editor again broke forth, and the ‘Big Injun’ for a time shed an undying lustre on the literature of the nineteenth century.”  The paper was short-lived:  “Like a meteor flashing along the midnight sky–brilliant for a moment, then rendering the darkness more intense–so the ‘Big Injun’ ran its course.”

McConnell’s transfer to nearby Fort Buffalo Springs marked the publication of his third handwritten, THE GRASSHOPPER.  Like its predecessors, THE GRASSHOPPER was short-lived.  Fort Buffalo Springs was soon abandoned for the more strategic Jacksboro post.

McConnell was finally reassigned to Fort Richardson where he contracted with a Weatherford, Tex. printer to publish The Flea.  This, his first printed newspaper, appeared Feb. 1, 1869, but lasted only six issues, until June 15, 1869.

According the Whisenut, McConnell’s handwritten papers did little more than provide diversion for the soldiers at their respective military posts, but “this was important.  Their very existence also implies that the life of the frontier soldier was mostly a monotonous existence despite the legend and aura of romance that surrounds the United States Cavalry.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  H.H. McConnell, Five Years a Cavalryman (Jacksboro, Texas:  J.N. Rogers and Co., 1889), p. 174; Donald W. Whisenhunt, “The Frontier Newspaper:  A Guide to Society and Culture,” Journalism Quarterly, 45:4 (Winter 1968), 727; see also Theronne Thompson, “Fort Buffalo Springs, Texas, Border Post,” West Texas Historical Association Yearbook, 36:168 (October 1960).

Location:  None

Granite Times (NV, 1908)

Leave a comment

Granite Times (NV, 1908)

Place of Publication:  Granite (seven miles west of Schurz in present-day Mineral County), Nevada

Frequency:  Weekly?

Volume and Issue Data:  March 20, 1908-May 1, 1908

Size and Format:  Two-page, three columns; graphite pencil and blue pencil headlines, or black ink in longhand, with occasional shading and coloring with crayon

Editor/Publisher:  Frank Eugene Bugbee (elected to Nevada Assembly 1931, 1933, and 1937) (1908)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 131, identifies paper as the Granite News.

General Description & Notes:

The Granite Times, according to its 1908 Easter edition, was “Devoted to the Mining and Material Interests of Granite and the Mountain View District.”  According to Highton, the paper was regularly sold for $1, while the special the Easter edition was $5.  The paper included general local news, editorials and poetry.  Stories addressed such events as the completion of an automobile road between Granite and Schurz.  The Rawhide Rustler, April 18, 1908, reproduced a portion of the Granite Times:  “We reproduce . . . a section of the Times, a paper printed in lead pencil in the new town of Granite . . . .  It shows the usual progressiveness of new mining camps in Nevada.”  Lingenfelter and Gash speculate that the Times suspended publication with its seventh number on May 1, 1908.

Earl and Moody report that editor Bugbee was an Ohio native who taught school in Kansas before arriving in Nevada at the turn of the century.  He visited several mining towns before joining the rush to Granite and starting the Times.  Bugbee reported in one issue that he had ordered a carload of type to print his paper, but through an error he received a mess of tripe.  He offered “a bar of soap and a pound of tripe” to those who solicited others for new subscriptions to the Times.  Noted the editor, “Do not get discouraged because have not the tools and equipment you should have to run your lease.  The editor has only three lead pencils, but he gets out a paper every week.”

The two extant issue of the Granite Times at the Nevada Historical Society were donated by Bugbee in 1909.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Phillip I. Earl and Eric Moody, “Type, Tripe and the Granite Times,” Nevada Magazine, (May-June 1982), 17-18; Jake Highton, Nevada Newspaper Days:  A History of Journalism in the Silver State (Stockton, Calif.:  Heritage West Books, 1990), pp. 97;  Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 131 (identifies paper as the Granite News); Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984), 110.

Locations:  April 17, May 1, 1908:  NvHi (also on microfilm)

The Grafton News (MA, no date)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Grafton, Massachusetts

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: Unknown

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Link: The American Antiquarian Society, Amateur Newspapers Collection

Locations:  American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA

The Gold Coast Gazette & Commercial Intelligencer (GHA, 1822-1825)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Ghana, West Africa

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: April 21, 1822-1825

Size and Format: “handwritten;” semi-official organ of the colonial government

Editor/Publisher: Sir Charles MacCarthy, governor of the British Gold Coast settlements

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to Jennifer Hasty’s history of the press in Ghana,

The first newspaper, The Gold Coast Gazette and Commercial Intelligencer, was published from 1822-25 by Sir Charles MacCarthy, governor of the British Gold Coast settlements. As a semi-official organ of the colonial government, the central goal of this Cape Coast newspaper was to provide information to European merchants and civil servants in the colony. Recognizing the growing number of mission-educated Africans in the Gold Coast, the paper also aimed at promoting literacy, encouraging rural development, and quelling the political aspirations of this class of native elites by securing their loyalty and conformity with the colonial system.

The appropriation of print media by local African elites began in mid-century with the publication of The Accra Herald by Charles Bannerman, son of a British lieutenant governor and a princess from the Asante royal family. Handwritten like MacCarthy’s former colonial paper, The Accra Herald was circulated to some 300 subscribers, two-thirds of them African. Enduring for 16 years, the success of Bannerman’s paper stimulated a proliferation of African-owned newspapers in the late nineteenth century . . . (emphasis added)

Governor MacCarthy was later killed in the First Ashanti war. His death and the claim that the victorious natives used his skull as a drinking cup did nothing to improve relations between the British and the coastal tribes. At least two other Ashanti Wars were fought in the 19th century.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  John D. Chick, “The Asanti Times: A Footnote in Ghanaian Press History,” African Affairs, 76:302 (1977), p. 80 (fn.3); “The Story of Africa: African History from the Dawn of Time,” BBC World Service, accessed August 18, 2011; Jennifer Hasty, “Ghana,” World Press Encyclopedia (2003);  JenniferHasty,  Big Language and Brown Envelopes: The Press and Political Culture in Ghana,  Ph.D. Dissertation, Duke University, 1999

Locations:  Unknown

The Gold Canon Switch (NV, 1854)

Leave a comment

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Johntown, Utah Territory (four miles from what became Virginia City, Nevada)

Frequency:  Frequency disputed:  weekly, monthly or irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Ca. 1854

Size and Format:  “Often several sheets

Editor/Publisher:  Joseph Webb (1854)

Title Changes and Continuations:  Unknown

General Description & Notes:

According to De Quille and Highton, the Switch was “a spicy, handwritten weekly, ‘often several sheets,’ and passed from hand to hand.”  Lingenfelter and Gash say the paper was “probably issued monthly on letter paper and in a very small edition.”  De Quille claims the paper was widely circulated and read in Johntown when it was a major mining center.  The editor, Joe Webb, was a partner of “Old Virginy” Fenimore, for whom Virginia City was later named, according to Lingenfelter.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Bob Karolevitz, “Pen and Ink Newspapers of the Old West,” Frontier Times, 44:2 (Feb.-Mar., 1970), 31; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 114; Jake Highton, Nevada Newspaper Days:  A History of Journalism in the Silver State (Stockton, Calif.:  Heritage West Books, 1990), pp. 2; Dan De Quille, History of The Big Bonanza (New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1947), p. 11.

Index Sources:  Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 61; Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984).

Locations:  None

Older Entries

%d bloggers like this: