Wawa, Kamloops (BC, 1891-1905)

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See the Kamloops Wawa

Tuli Times (ZIM, 1891)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Tuli, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia); “established on July 1st, 1890, by the Pioneer Column itself and by ‘A’ Troop of the British South Africa Company’s Police. This fort was first named Fort Selous, after the hunter, explorer and then guide to the Column. The hill on which the fort was built stands less than a mile south of the Shashi River in a hollow basin surrounded by higher hills—its siting was therefore frequently criticised for it was vulnerable to long-range guns and even rifles, a necessary consideration with regard to any threat from the Transvaal Republic”  (from Our Rhodesian Heritage).

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: Circa July, 1891

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to Rhodesiana (Vol. 12, September 1965 and republished on the Our Rhodesian Heritage website), from 1890 to 1893 the fort at Tuli was the main entry to Rhodesia and a small town rapidly grew up at the foot of the fort. It was the head of the telegraph, and here the first hospital in Rhodesia was started by Mother Patrick and her Dominican Sisters on April 1st, 1891. By July, 1891, Tuli even boasted its own newspaper, the Tuli Times. Rhodes reached Tuli in October, 1890, on his way to Mashonaland but the rains ended his journey there. Lord Randolph Churchill, Sir Frederick Carrington, Jameson and Beit were all entertained in the fort in July, 1891, while the large numbers of wagons and new immigrants, streaming north, had to replenish their supplies at Tuli and provided the few stores and the British South Africa Company’s Commissariat Officer with exorbitant profits. In 1893 Tuli was the base from which the Southern Column marched on Bulawayo but thereafter it declined for the Tati-Mangwe road now provided a more direct route to Bulawayo and then on to Salisbury.

Vann and VanArsdel cite the Tuli Times as handwritten and cyclostyled.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 291; Press Reference-Zimbabwe; Louis W. Bolze, “The Book Publishing Scene in Zimbabwe,” The African Book Publishing Record, 6:3-4 (1980), 229–236

Link:  Our Rhodesian Heritage

Locations:  None

Mashonaland and Zambesian Times (ZIM, 1891-1892)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Salisbury, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia)

Frequency: Weekly for 62 weeks

Volume and Issue Data: June 1891; weekly circulation: 180 copies

Size and Format: Pen and ink and then replicated by “cyclostyle” or early stenograph “for the Argus company”

Editor/Publisher: William Ernest Fairbridge

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to several sources, the Mashonaland and Zambesian Times, a hand-written paper described by one journalist as a “crude but readable cyclostyled sheet,” was published for 62 weeks from June 1891 into 1892. On October 20, 1892, The Rhodesia Herald replaced the Mashonaland and Zambesian Times as the country’s major daily newspaper. That paper, since renamed The Herald , survives today as Zimbabwe’s oldest and largest circulation daily newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 290; Press Reference-Zimbabwe; Louis W. Bolze, “The Book Publishing Scene in Zimbabwe,” The African Book Publishing Record, 6:3-4 (1980), 229–236

Locations:  None

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

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Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Kamloops, British Columbia, Canada

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, May 2, 1891-Vol.14, No. 1, 1905; Nos. 1-213

Size and Format:  Text largely in shorthand of Chinook jargon; three columns; small format; copies mimeographed

Editor/Publisher:  Father LeJeune

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905 )

This newspaper was published in Kamloops, British Columbia between 1891 and 1905 in a Chinook script developed by Father LeJeune.  The paper was handwritten then mimeographed.

The first page’s three columns are each written in a different script.  The first transliterates the Chinookan script of column two and column three translates both into English.  Column three reads:

“This paper is named Kamloops Wawa.  It is born just now.  It wants to appear and speak every week, to all who want to learn to write fast.  No matter if they be white men.”

[Note: The box containing the Kamloops Wawa includes separately paged inserts in various languages with duplicate numbering.  Also includes:  The Kamloops phonographer, no. 4 (Oct. 1892); circular (2 pp.):  Coldwater, Aug. 24, 1892; printed letter dated April 1, 1892 in French.  Five unidentified fragments;  2 pp. leaflet, at head of paper, the Kamloops Wawa symbols, on back, “the Duployan phonetic alphabet complete”; 2 copies (4 pp.) of the Chinook shorthand; pp. 49-80 ith chapter headings, “Stations of the Cross”,  “Preparation for confession”, “Act of miracle,” “Monseigneur Laurence”, “Fruitless temptation,” etc.]

Kamloops Wawa (BC, 1891-1905)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  James C. Pillings, Bibliography of the Chinookan Languages, Bulletin 15 (Washington, D.C.:  Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethnology, 1893), pp. 46-47; Pillings, Bibliography of the Salishan Language, Bulletin 16 (Washington, D.C.:  Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of Ethnology, 1893), p. 38.

Locations:  McFarlin Library, Special Collections, University of Tulsa

The Educator (UT, 1891)

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The Educator (UT, 1891)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Hyrum, Utah (1891)

Frequency:  “weekly”

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 8, No. 4, February 4, 1891

Size and Format:  7 3/4 x 13 inches, ledger book paper, single column

Editor/Publisher:  Bertha Nielsen, editor; “A manuscript paper published weekly by & in the interest (sic) of the young L.M.I.A. No. 2 of Hyrum” (i.e., Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Assn.)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description & Notes

According to Alter, the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Associations in and around Hyrum, Utah published weekly literary journals largely in the interests and for the entertainment of their members during the late 1880s.  The publications carried news, religious items and weather reports.

The Educator, along with “THE KNOWLEDGE SEEKER,” “THE YOUNG LADIES THOUGHTS,” “A MANUSCRIPT PAPER” and “THE EVENING STAR” were published by Mormon Mutual Improvement Associations under various editors, since officers in these organizations changed hands regularly.

Utah State University Special Collections and Archives has 25 file folders containing these various Mutual Improvement Association newspapers.  They do not have a complete run of any of them, however.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 90; Lorraine T. Washburn, “Culture in Dixie,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 29 (July 1961), 259-260; Mark A. Pendleton, “The Orderville United Order of Zion,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 7 (October 1939), 151.

Locations:  John A. Israelson’s papers, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University, Logan, UT

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