The Soldier Weekly-News (ID, 1893)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Soldier, Idaho

Frequency:  Weekly (monthly?)

Volume and Issue Data:  Two issues extant:  Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan. 13, 1893, and No. 2? Feb 10, 1893

Size and Format:  8 x 13 inches; one column; two pages

Editor/Publisher:  Soldier Literary Society

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The paper’s motto, written just below the title, on both extant copies is “Hew to the line, let chips fall where they may.”  The first issue states that “in obedience to the gracious request of the Soldier Literary Society, we assume the publication of a paper in promoting the interests of that Society, and will present our first number this evening, under the title of the ‘Soldier Weekly News.'”

“We make our editorial bow on the sea of journalism, with some misgivings as to our untried ability to please all, but with the aid of the members of this Society and an earnest effort on our part, we hope to issue weekly, a journal which may interest and amuse each and every member of this Society.

“In politics the news will be strictly independent.

“Contributions, other than objectional or personally abusive articles, solicited from members of the Society.  Any article calculated to injure the feelings of any member of our Society or any citizen of our place will not be accepted.  As many of the ‘home staff’ possess decided talent in the journalistic line, we may expect newsy and interesting contributions.  Having secured a corps of able correspondents we promise our readers the cream of legislative news from Boise, as well as events of interest in all (remainder of line illegible)” (from page one, first issue, Jan. 13, 1893).

The extant copies contain “Local News” shorts, “Notes from neighboring places,” appeals for advertisements and an obituary.

The “Notes from neighboring places” section of the Feb. 10 issue begins, “Telegrams from up the Creek.”

The Feb. 10 issue notes, “We are pleased to record that the circulation of the ‘Soldier Weekly-News‘ is rapidly increasing and advertisements coming in liberally.  It affords us much pleasure to see our paper thus appreciated.  We entertain the ambition ere the close of 1893 of securing the largest circulation of any paper in Idaho.

“We are not giving to our readers a larger amount of news, local and foreign than any paper in Idaho (sic) the state.”

Information Sources:                                                                  

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Idaho State Historical Society, Boise, ID

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Mount Idaho Radiator (ID, 1873)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Mount Idaho (Grangeville), Idaho

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Feb. 1873

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Kenneth L. Robison, “Idaho Territorial Newspapers,” unpublished M.S. thesis, University of Oregon, 1966

Citations: “The Mount Idaho Radiator.” Idaho Signal [Lewiston, Idaho] 8 Mar. 1873: n.p. Nineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers. Web accessed: 7 Sept. 2015.URL: http://find.galegroup.com/dvnw/infomark.do?&source=gale&prodId=DVNW&userGroupName=acd_dvnw&tabID=T003&docPage=article&docId=GT3015499776&type=multipage&contentSet=LTO&version=1.0; Gale Document Number: GT3015499776

Locations:  None

Moscow Argus (ID, 1878-1879)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Moscow, Idaho (1878-1879)

Frequency:  Quarterly?

Volume and Issue Data:  At least one issue during the winter of 1878-1879

Size and Format:  Unknown?

Editor/Publisher:  R.H. Barton, G.P. Richardson and Dr. William Taylor (1878-1879)

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to An Illustrated History of North Idaho, the Moscow Argus was the first paper in Latah County, Idaho. “It was published in the winter of 1878-79 by the Moscow Literary Society and its editors were R.H. Barton, George P. Richardson, and Dr. William Taylor. They had no printing press, so the paper was written out by hand and was read at regular weekly meetings of the society.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Bert Cross,”History of Moscow’s Newspapers,” in Moscow Centennial edition, Idahonian; Kenneth L. Robison, “Idaho Territorial Newspapers,” unpublished M.S. thesis, University of Oregon, 1966; An Illustrated History of North Idaho Containing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai, and Shoshone Counties (Western Historical Publishing Co., 1903) p. 1219.

Locations:  None

The Advocate (ID, 1879)

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The Advocate (ID, 1879)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Placerville, Granite Creek, Boise City, Baker City and Idaho City, Idaho

Frequency:   Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  May 16, 1879

Size and Format:  8 x 13 inches; one column

Editor/Publisher:  Thomas Haney, editor and manager; other editors listed on title page from respective towns (see below); P.D. Rothwell, teacher

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description & Notes:

This school newspaper consisted of a series of student essays.  It is unclear how the paper was organized or produced, but several student editors from various towns in southern Idaho apparently contributed materials of their own or from students residing in these locales.

The title page-cover is illustrated with a series of nine circles, each filled with the names of the editors/authors, or place names.  The motto of the paper reads, “What is Noble in Man, What is Lovely in Woman.”

The editors from the different schools represented are identified on the title-front page inside circles drawings:

Boise City Editors: Carrie Cartio, Ella Cartio, James Allington, M.B. Givinns(?), A.H. Redway
Placerville Editors: H(?) O’Brien
Baker City Editors: E.L. Sturjill, L.M. Sturjill, J.F. James, Fanny White, M.M. Robbins, A.B. Carter
Idaho City Editors (L): E.A. Kingsley, Lena Broadbeck, Anna G. Galbraith, John P. Barry, Peniel French, Emma Bright
Idaho City Editors (R): Gage Lewis, W.S. Galbraith, Frank McGuinness, Nellie Davis, Jn. E. Craig, A.G. Galbraith (2nd), E.A. Kingsley (2nd).

In one extant essay, “Our School,” a student author notes that the school had desks for 13 students.  The building is described as “very old” and “very dirty.”  “This school house is a very dirty one, the more you scrub it the dirtier it looks.” Even the stove was deemed “very old.”  Despite that, Hannora Halley, the author of the essay, writes “I would rather go to school than to stay home.” She does not identify the locations of her school or home.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Library and Archives, Idaho State Historical Society, Boise, ID

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