The Little Chief (OK, 1899)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Darlington, Oklahoma

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan., 1899-Vol. 1, No. 3, Feb., 1899

Size and Format:  Four page, two columns, handwritten and mimeographed

Editor/Publisher:  Rev. W.M. Wellman, pastor, Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians Congregational Mission (1899)

Title Changes and Continuations:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, The Little Chief served as the mission’s promotional paper.  It was “devoted to the interests of the Christian work now being done among the Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians in general and to the Congregational Mission in particular.”  The paper contained appeals to donors outside the mission community and reported the “progress” of the Indians toward Christianity.  The paper also published tribal statistics, church news, inspirational statements and other news of activities related to the mission community.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian andAlaskaNative Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 247-248

Locations:  OkMuB-J

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Halaquah Times (OK, 1871-1875)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Wyandotte Mission School, Last Creek, Indian Territory (Oklahoma)

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 2, No. 3-Vol. 6, No. 6, ca. 1871-1875

Size and Format:  (check extant copies–at Kansas collection)

Editor/Publisher:  Ida Johnson and Julia Robitaille, editors; Halaquah, Literary Society of Wyandotte Mission School (1871-1875)

Title Changes and Continuations:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, the Halaquah Times was a manuscript magazine published by the students of the Wyandote Mission’s literary society.  It contained letters and essays on student and school activities.  Many of the essays focused on “social improvement.”  The magazine was edited by Ida Johnson and her associate July Robitaille.

According to Murphy and Murphy, the student editors made one copy and then had other students at the mission school make additional copies.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 (Norman:  University of Oklahoma Press, 1936); Grace Ernestine Ray, Early Oklahoma Newspapers (Norman:  University of Oklahoma Press, 1928); James E. Murphy and Sharon M. Murphy, Let My People Know:  American Indian Journalism, 1828-1978 (Norman:  University, 1981); David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 143-144.

Locations:  “Miscellaneous–Halaquah,” Manuscripts, Kansas State Historical Society, contains two undated issues, written in copybooks

The Creek Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly (OK, 1870-1875)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Tullahassee Manual Labor School, Creek Nation, Wagoner County, Indian Territory (Oklahoma) (1870-1875)

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  The Creek Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly (Vol. 1, No. 1, Dec. 1870-Vol. 1, No. 5, April 27, 1871); Our Monthly (Vol. 2, No. 1, Jan. 1873-Vol. 4, No. 10, Oct. 1875); may have run as late as 1876

Size and Format:  Two columns, published in both Creek and English languages

Editor/Publisher:  William S. Robertson and Ann Augusta Robertson (1870-1875)

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Creek Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly (1870-1871); Our Monthly (1873-1875?)

General Description and Notes:

The first volume (1870-1872) of the small, two-column monthly appeared only in manuscript.  Later issues were printed on a hand press donated by Creek National Council.

The Rev. William S. Roberston, a Presbyterian missionary associated with the Tullahassee school since 1850, assisted by his daughter Ann Augusta, edited contributions mostly from Creek student exercises.  The purpose of the paper was “the moral and intellectual improvement” of the students, and to “give the Creeks parts of the Bible and religious songs in their own language.”  In addition to student work, the Robertsons solicited writings from any Creeks who were interested in the school or its publications.  The monthly’s manuscript editions were received so well by the community that the Creek National Council provided funds to purchase a printing press and appropriated $100 annually to cover printing 1,000 copies per issue a year.  Copies were distributed free in the Creek Nation.  Our Monthly first appeared in print in Jan. 1873.

The paper was published in both Creek and English, with many issues almost entirely in Creek.  Ann Eliza Robertson translated some articles, scripture passages and hymns into Creek while others were written by Creeks.

In addition to general news about the Creek nation and education matters, the paper also published political commentary.  For example, an 1875 Creek letter called for the repeal of the Treaty of 1866, which gave railroads a claim to Indian land.  Local advertising and local news also appeared.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Althea Bass, The Story of Tullahassee (Oklahoma City:  Semco Color Press, 1960); Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 (Norman:  University of Oklahoma Press, 1936);  James Constantine Pilling, Bibliography of the Muskhogean Languages (Washington, D.C.:  Government Printing Office, 1889); James E. Murphy and Sharon M. Murphy, Let My People Know:  American Indian Journalism, 1828-1978 (Norman:  University, 1981), 59; David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 293-296.

Locations:  Danky and Hady; OkMu; OkTu; ULS

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