The Butterfly (IL, early 20th century)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Chicago(?), Illinois

Frequency: “Several volumes”

Volume and Issue Data: Early 20th century

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Members of the Butterfly Society

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

The Butterfly is an aesthetic journal published by the Butterfly Society in the early part of this century.  The first two volumes are completely handwritten as well as illustrated.  Later issues were hand typed.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  The Chicago Public Library, Special Collections, Harold Washington Library Center, Chicago, IL

Bumble Bee Budget, Flumgudgeon Gazette and (OR, 1845)

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See FLUMGUDGEON GAZETTE AND BUMBLE BEE BUDGET

The Bumble Bee (LA, 1864)

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Publication History:

The Bumble Bee, LA, 1864

Place of Publication:  “Camp near Shreveport (LA);” “Office of Bumble Bee for the present will be under the board shelter of Co. ‘E’, which is a very airy and healthy location in dry weather.”

Frequency:  “Semi occasionally” (from No. 1)

Volume and Issue Data: April 1, 1864

Size and Format:  13+ x ? inches

Editor/Publisher:  “Cook & Hu(?)ghey, Editors & Proprietors”

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description & Notes:

This is a handwritten Confederate Army paper published near Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1864. Its motto on first number: “Oh brush that Bee away or you will surely get a sting.” The extant copy (see above) includes “Local” news, anecdotes, and appeals for subscriptions.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations: Arkansas History Commission, Little Rock, AR (according to John L. Ferguson, State Historian [letter to HNP editor, June 21, 1993], “I think that we have a few similar little CSA papers on microfilm”).

Bum Hill Gazette (CA, 1906)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  San Francisco, California

Frequency:  Two issues

Volume and Issue Data:  May [no day], and May 23, both 1906

Size and Format:  56-60 x 42 cm.; May (no date) May 23 issue is 2 pp.; “three folio leaves”; pen and ink; illustrated with watercolor

Editor/Publisher:  Published by “Prowlers of Ashbarrel Street, New San Francisco;” compiled, written and illustrated by Hazel Snell; also edited by “U.R.A. Bum, I.B.A. Tramp”

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

Two issues of a newspaper edited by Hazel Snell (Holmes), San Francisco, were donated to the Bancroft Library by the editor.  In her own undated description of the Gazette, which accompanied the donation, Ms. Holmes writes:

“Three folio leaves compiled, written and illustrated by Snell as a neighborhood paper, residing with her parents on Ashbury Street between Hayes and Fell near the pan-handle of Golden Gate Park.  Some of the humorous jibes were contributed by William Jones Hanlon, now a retired Colonel of the U.S. Air Force.  As far as known, first amateur paper issued after earthquake and fire in San Francisco on April 18, 1906.”

The first number which was dated “May, 1906,” contained sections on business, society, poetry, and local news, and includes want ads and advertisements.  The two-page second number, dated “May 23, 1906,” noted:

“Editors:  U.R.A. Bum, I.B.A. Tramp.  Published any old time.  Sub. Price–six doughnut holes on a toothpick.  When your subscription expires–call an undertaker.  Price per copy–a can of corn bread.”

The motto of the paper, as indicated in the second issue was, “To see ourselves as others saw us.”  The second issue also announced on page one:

“The editors wish to inform the general public that a third and last Edition of the B.H.G. will be published and for the suckers of the same they will depend on the reports of the citizens of this street.  The names of reporters will not be mentioned.

“Kindly place reports in hands of Editors.

“The painting at head of the edition is the reproduction of the famous masterpiece rescued from Hopkins Art Institute during the ‘grate’ fire.”

The editor also claimed, “The first edition of the B.H.G. was probably the most elaborate publication since the earthquake.  It was encased in a beautiful gold and silver frame and given a warm reception in St. Nick’s Kitchen, evidently keeping its circulation in a good condition.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  University of California, Berkeley Bancroft Library manuscripts collection, C-II 81.

Bugle (NV, 1880)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Junctionville (also known as Bonelli’s Ferry), Nevada

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  c. Feb. 1880-c. 1880

Size and Format:  Written on letter sheets

Editor/Publisher:  Leonard Bonelli, Bugle Publishing Co.

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

The Pioche Record, Feb. 28, 1880, reports that the Bugle was a weekly written on letter sheets by the ferryman’s son, Leonard Bonelli, who lists himself as the editor and the Bugle Publishing Co. as publisher.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Pioche Record, Feb. 28, 1880; Lingenfelter and Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984), p. 123.

Locations:  No extant issues located

Bow and Arrow (MI, 1833)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Michilimackinac, Michigan (1833)

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  No. 2, Oct. 1, 1833

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1833)

Title Changes and Continuations:  None

General Description & Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, The Bow and Arrow was a manuscript magazine devoted to Indian life, history, opinion, and names.  This was editor Schoolcraft’s third handwritten publication, the first being a literary magaznie published from 1809 to 1818 and the second being The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (1826-1827) published in Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.  The Oct. 1, 1833 issue of the Bow and Arrow contained an article entitled “The Indian” dealing with stereotypes and characteristics of the American Indian.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Vernon Kinietz, “Schoolcraft’s Manuscript Magazines,” Bibliographical Society of America Papers, 35 (April-June, 1941), 151-154.  Indexed in David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. ParinsAmerican Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 44.

Locations:  DLC

The Boston News-Letter (MA, 1700-1704)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Boston, Massachusetts

Frequency: Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  1700-1704; after 1704, the paper was printed

Size and Format: Approximately 6.25 x 10.5 inches

Editor/Publisher: John Campbell, Boston postmaster

Title Changes and Continuation: Boston News-Letter (printed edition beginning 1704)

Boston News-Letter (printed edition, 1704)

General Description & Notes:

The Boston News-Letter is generally regarded as the first “successful” newspaper in the American colonies. From 1704 to 1722, the last date being three years after he retired as postmaster, editor John Campbell produced a printed newsletter. However, for the first four years of the News-Letters’ existence, it was published in handwritten form.

Benjamin Harris’s Publick Occurrences preceded the News-Letter by at least 10 years, but Day’s paper lasted only one issue and was shut down by authorities. As the Campbell’s first printed issue of the News-Letter boldly states, the paper was “Published by Authority.”

Postmaster Campbell used his postal role as to gather information which he published “in the form of a newsletter–the primitive, handwritten report that had been the common medium of communication in Europe before the invention of printing. Most of the information sent out by Campbell was concerned with commercial and governmental matters.”

According to one historian, “There was such a demand for his news letter that Campbell began to look around for some way of relieving the pressure upon his time and energy. He got his brother, Duncan, to help, but even together they could not supply the demand for news. The just couldn’t write longhand fast enough.”

The first printed edition, replacing the handwritten version, appeared on April 24, 1704. “It was called the Boston News-Letter, an appropriate title, since it was merely a continuation of the publication the Campbells had been producing since 1700.”

Source: http://blog.genealogybank.com/a-mystery-from-the-first-handwritten-newspaper-published-in-america.html

Boston News-Letter (Boston, Mass.), 18-25 November 1706, p. 4

Information Sources:

Bibliography: Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, First Series, March 1867, Volume 9, pp. 485-501 (Nine issues of the News-Letter from 1703 are presented in this collection); Frank Luther Mott, American Journalism: A History of Newspapers in the United States Through 250 Years (New York, 1941); Willard G. Bleyer, Main Currents in the History of American Journalism (New York, 1973); Edwin Emery and Michael Emery,  The Press and America,  Fifth ed.  (Englewood Cliffs, 1984); Wm. David Sloan and Julie Hedgepath Williams, The Early American Press, 1690-1783 (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1994), p.  18; Wm. David Sloan, “John Campbell and the Boston News-Letter,” AEJMC website (2004); Tom Kemp, “A Mystery from the First Handwritten Newspaper in America,” http://blog.genealogybank.com/a-mystery-from-the-first-handwritten-newspaper-published-in-america.html, posted Nov. 20, 2012, accessed Feb. 7, 2013.

Locations:  American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA; State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

The Bomb Shell (MN, 1854)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Ripley(?), Minnesota

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1854

Size and Format: Unknown; may be printed “from type carved by hand.”

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description & Notes:

“The paper is pictured on the end papers as well as contained in the unpaginated illustrations portion.” (quote from Danky letter to HNP editor, June 21, 1993).  This could refer to the book by George S. Hage, Newspapers on the Minnesota Frontier, 1849-1860.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Referred to in George S. Hage’s book Newspapers on the Minnesota Frontier, 1849-1860, and presumably copies were used inside the cover.

Locations:   Information came from James Danky, Newspapers and Periodicals Librarian at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

The Blister (PA, 1921-1927)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Gettysburg, PA

Frequency: “Created almost every day when school was in session”

Volume and Issue Data: November 5, 1921-March 29, 1927

Size and Format: Single typewritten and hand-illustrated page

Editor/Publisher: Variable

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

The Blister, PA, 1922

General Description & Notes:

Note from Gettysburg College Special Collections Librarian David Hedrick (to HNP editor, June 22, 1993):

The Blister was created almost every day when school was in session. The Blister consisted of a single typewritten page usually containing an ‘Editorial’, some campus news, a couple of jokes, and a hand-drawn cartoon. It seems that only a limited number of copies of each issue were created and at least one copy was always posted on a campus bulletin-board. An almost complete run is maintained in our collections . . . . This publication has been microfilmed, and can be acquired via interlibrary loan.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: Charles Glatfelter, A Salutary Influence: Gettysburg College, 1832-1985 (Gettysburg, 1987).

Locations: Musselman Library, Special Collections, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA

Black Republican and Office-Holders Journal (NY, 1865)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  New York, New York

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  August, 1865

Size and Format:  Last issue 4 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Pluto Jumbo

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Includes line drawings.  Appears to be handwritten, though it’s hard to see on microfilm.  Check the printed finding aid that accompanies the 1948 Library of Congress filming project to determine the location of the original.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Available in microform from DLC (1865). LC card no. sn85-42252.  OCLC no. 12006614, 2611164.  Subject focus and/or Features:  Newspaper.

On microfilm at The State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

Original may be at the Library of Congress.

The Black Fly (MI, 1913-1915)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Douglas Lake, Michigan

Frequency: Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  July and August, 1913-1915

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Student surveyors at surveying camp, Douglas Lake, Michigan

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description & Notes:

This paper is listed as a “printed holding”, but may still be relevant–perhaps it is partial manuscript.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Floyd Streeter, Michigan Bibliography (Michigan Historical Commission, 1921), p. 42 (entry 380):

The black fly, v. 2-4. Camp Davis, Mich., 1913-1915. U.
Published irregularly during July and August at the University of Michigan surveying camp at Douglas Lake, Mich.”

Locations:  Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Big Injun (TX, 1866, 1869)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Belknap, Texas

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Published sometime between 1866 and 1869.

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  H.H. McConnell

Title Changes and Continuation:  Same editor/publisher produced LITTLE JOKER at Jacksboro, Texas, prior to his transfer to Fort Belknap.  After creating BIG INJUN, he was transfered again a short distance to Fort Buffalo and “again broke forth” with THE GRASSHOPPER.

General Description & Notes:

According to Whisenhunt, the Jacksboro area had no fewer than four newspapers between 1866 and 1869, although only one was printed.  The editor of all four was H.H. McConnell, a soldier first assigned to Jacksboro, Texas in 1866.  McConnell recounts his journalistic efforts and military experience on the Texas frontier in the Reconstruction period in his autobiography, Five Years a Cavalryman.

Shortly after he arrived in Jacksboro, McConnell and other soldiers published a weekly newspaper, LITTLE JOKER, on foolscap.  The paper circulated among the soldiers at Jacksboro.  The Jacksboro post was temporarily abandoned by the military, and the LITTLE JOKER “was ignominiously packed on a Quartermaster’s hourse and moved to Fort Belknap.”

At Fort Belknap soon issued another handwritten paper, BIG INJUN, intended for a military audience.  According to McConnell, “Here the genius of the editor again broke forth, and the ‘Big Injun’ for a time shed an undying lustre on the literature of the nineteenth century.”  The paper was short-lived:  “Like a meteor flashing along the midnight sky–brilliant for a moment, then rendering the darkness more intense–so the ‘Big Injun’ ran its course.”

McConnell’s transfer to nearby Fort Buffalo Springs marked the publication of his third handwritten, THE GRASSHOPPER.  Like its predecessors, THE GRASSHOPPER was short-lived.  Fort Buffalo Springs was soon abandoned for the more strategic Jacksboro post.

McConnell was finally reassigned to Fort Richardson where he contracted with a Weatherford, Tex. printer to publish The Flea.  This, his first printed newspaper, appeared Feb. 1, 1869, but lasted only six issues, until June 15, 1869.

According the Whisenut, McConnell’s handwritten papers did little more than provide diversion for the soldiers at their respective military posts, but “this was important.  Their very existence also impolies that the life of the frontier soldier was mostly a monotonous existence despite the legend and aura of romance that surrounds the United States Cavalry.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  H.H. McConnell, Five Years a Cavalryman (Jacksboro, Texas:  J.N. Rogers and Co., 1889), p. 174; Donald W. Whisenhunt, “The Frontier Newspaper:  A Guide to Society and Culture,” Journalism Quarterly, 45:4 (Winter 1968), 727; see also Theronne Thompson, “Fort Buffalo Springs, Texas, Border Post,” West Texas Historical Association Yearbook, 36:168 (October 1960).

Locations:  None

Big Elk Budget (MT, 1890)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Big Elk (Wheatland), Montana

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.  1, No. 1,  January 30, 1890 (1890-189?)

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  J.A. Crouse

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Available on microfilm from Montana Historical Society. Hand-written.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Links: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036020/

Locations: Montana Historical Society Library, Helena, MT

Beltionian Review (IL, 1857-?)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  4 years of copies (no dates given)

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Beltionian Literary Society

Title Changes and Continuation: “Sister” publication The Evening Star (produced by the Student Lyceum League, Wheaton College); extant copy: Vol. 1, No. 3.

General Description & Notes:

The Beltionian Literary Society located at Wheaton College, was preceded by the Student Lyceum League.  The Society was established in 1857 and functioned until 1958.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  http://a2z.my.wheaton.edu/literary-societies/beltionian-literary-society; Special Collections, Wheaton College Archives, Wheaton, IL

The Belmont Star (AB, 1889-1890)

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Belmont AB Star (AB, 1889)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Belmont School, Belmont, AB Canada

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Issues published in February 1889 to May 1890

Size and Format:  Variable

Editor/Publisher:  Albert Fraser, Simon Borwick, et al.

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Star

General Description and Notes:

According to an Edmonton city website, The Star was a handwritten newspaper put together by students of the Belmont School and teacher, James Bond Steele.  The Edmonton Archives have three editions of the newspaper, February 1889, March 1889 and May 1890.  Here is a scan and transcription of the introduction of the first edition:

StarIntroductionv3

The Belmont Star (AB, 1889)

The Belmont Star
Albert Fraser – Editor-in-Chief
Belmont, Alta., Feb’y, 1889

The Star

We present to-day the first number of the Belmont Star. It is started for the instruction [and]amusement of the pupils of Belmont[School]. All the news and other matter in the Star will be made up by the scholars. The school-house was put up in 1882, and the first teacher was Mr. Murphy. The old pupils generally leave in the spring, or at hay-making time, because there is more work then than any other time. Some of them stop a week or two in the autumn. New scholars generally begin in spring or summer. There were a few of the scholars sick for a while. Some didn’t go to school for two weeks; some for about a week. There were five examinations, one in 1885, one in 1886, one in 1887, and two in 1888.

And a transcription of the local news (pictured above):

Local News
Simon Borwick – – Editor

Robins were singing in town on March 2nd.

Henry J. Fraser saw a band of ducks on March 1st.

Rain fell on the 27th of February.

Eggs are 33 1/3 c a dozen, and butter is 40 c a pound.

The weather was fine all the month, with the exception of one week.

There are cracks in the ground 4 5/8 inches wide, and three feet deep.

Prairie fires are raging and have done some damage. Mr. Stedman had his house burnt, and others have lost a good deal of hay.

This has been a very open winter. The coldest day was Friday, Feb’y 22nd. It was 28 degrees below zero.

Some of the pupils were sick in school lately. Others were forced to make some sudden trips outside on account of their noses bleeding.

The ice is melting on the lakes.

Mr. William Rowland’s team ran away on the 26th.

The air has been very smoky lately.

Harry Fulton left scho[ol] on the 1st instant.

The Ducks

The ducks come early in the spring to lay their eggs. They lay them in a bush or by a lake. After she hatches her eggs she loses her feathers and can’t fly till in September. Then all the ducks begin to fly around the country. In the fall they go home to another country and stay till the next spring.

___ Henry J. Fraser

(City of Edmonton Archives volunteer Kathryn Merrett transcribed the Belmont Star stories above.)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Link: http://www.transformingedmonton.ca/index.php/2011/04/20/belmont-school-newspaper-the-star-part-i/

Locations:  Edmonton Archives, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Belgravian Weekly Journal (ENG-AUS, 1866)

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The Belgravian Weekly Journal (Eng-Aus, 1866)

The Belgravian Weekly Journal (Eng-Aus, 1866)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Aboard the ship Belgravia on its journey from England to Fremantle, Western Australia, with convicts, 28 April 1866-23 June, 1866

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1866

Size and Format:  See image of the front page of No. 2, May 5, 1866

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Convict shipboard paper en route from England to Western Australia.

Information Sources:                            

Bibliography: William Irvin, Journals on board the convict ships Palmerston, 1861, Belgravia, 28th Apr. 1866-23rd June, 1866 and Norwood, 27th Apr.-6th July, 1867 [microform], reproduction of typescript.

Locations:  State Library of Western Australia; thanks to Annette Delbianco of the SLWA.

The Beehive (UT, 1887-1889)

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The Beehive, UT, 1887

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  St. George, UT

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 5 and No.8; Vol. 2, No. 1, January 4, 1887; Vol. 2, No.2,  January 15, 1887; Vol. 2,  No. 3; Vol.2, No. 4,  December 20, 1887; Vol. 4, No. 2,  Feb 15, 1887; Vol. 4, No. 5, April 10,1888; Vol. 5, No. 12,  March 12,1889; Vol 7, No.2; Vol.? No.8

Size and Format:  Legal/ledger size lined pages, one column

Editor/Publisher:  Belle McArthur (March 12, 1889), Julie Macdonald (Vol. 2, No. 4, 1887), Miss F. DeFriez (Vol. 4, No. 5, April 10, 1888)

Title Changes and Continuation: None

The Beehive, UT, 1887

General Description & Notes:

This was a Mormon Ladies Improvement Society publication. Multiple extant copies of The Beehive are in various states of readability. Most issues have an illustrated masthead, but otherwise blank title page. The stories are in neat cursive writing on lined ledger paper

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Utah State Historical Society, Mss A 1053

The Beehive, UT, Vol. 2, No. 3, N.D.

Bee, Honey (OR, No date)

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See HONEY BEE

The Battleford Fluke (SK, 1897)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1897

Size and Format:  Single page

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Saskatchewan Archives, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan; Laurie Family Papers (S-A668)

Barometer (MA-CA, 1849)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Shipboard Edward Everett (1849)

Frequency:  Weekly, every Saturday

Volume and Issue Data:  The Edward Everett departed Boston Jan. 13, 1849

Size and Format:  Four pages, handwritten

Editor/Publisher:  “A board of five editors was responsible for the journal” (Lewis); members of the Boston and California Joint Mining and Trading Company en route to the California gold fields

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

According to Lewis, the first organized contingent to leave Boston for the California gold fields was the Boston and California Joint Mining and Trading Company.  The group sailed from Boston aboard the Edward Everett, a 700-ton “fast-ship,” on January 13, 1849.  The company of 150 men, included eight sea captains, four doctors, a clergyman, a mineralogist, a geologist, merchants, manufacturers, farmers, artisans and medical and divinity students.

The Edward Everett was a relatively new ship (approximately six years old) and well equipped.  The bunks below deck were named after Boston localities.  To combat boredom at sea, numerous regularly scheduled activities were organized, including a musical band, a weekly newspaper, Sunday and mid-week church services, and lectures.

The ship’s newspaper Barometer was intended to circulate the ship’s news among the passengers and the crew, and to publish “original contributions in prose and verse.”  Lewis calls the Barometer, “probably the earliest of the gold-ship ‘newspapers'” (p. 89).  According to Lewis, the Barometer was

a four-page hand-written sheet issued every Saturday during the voyage of the Edward Everett.  A board of five editors was responsible for the journal, the columns of which were filled with daily happenings on the ship, together with a record of her position and speed, and a leavening of lighter fare in the form of “original prose and poetical matter.”

Lewis notes that this and other shipboard newspapers (see, e.g., EMIGRANT, THE PETREL, and SHARK) “lacked the formality of print but more nearly approached conventional journalism” than the various travel journals and diaries kept during the voyages.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Oscar Lewis, Sea Routes to the Gold Fields:  The Migration by Water to California in 1849-1852 (New York:  A.A. Knopf, 1949), pp. 89-92; Roy Atwood, “Shipboard News: Nineteenth Century Handwritten Periodicals at Sea,” Paper Presentation to the History Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication Annual Convention, Chicago, IL, 1997.

Locations:  Bancroft Library, CA?

 

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