Winter Chronicle or New Georgia Gazette (NWT, 1819-1820)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Winter Harbour, Melville Island, Parry Islands, North West Territories, Canada

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  No. 1-21; Nov 1, 1819 to March 20, 1820.

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Edward Sabine, Captain of the Ship Hecla.

Title Changes and Continuation:

General Description and Notes:

“Written, produced and circulated in Mss., by members of the Parry expedition while they were at their winter quarters in the Arctic, and published, in printed form, after the expedition’s return to London under the title:  North Georgia Gazette, and Winter Chronicle.

 “When the expedition arrived in the Arctic, Parry called the group of islands he discovered the “New Georgia Islands,” but having afterwards remembered that this name was already used in another part of the world he decided to change it to “North Georgian Islands” to honor George the Third.  This change accounts for the variation in name as used in the title on the manuscript copy and that used on the published editions.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Rare Book & Special Collections Library, University of Illinois Library at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL

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The Western Pioneer (TX, 1862)

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THE WESTERN PIONEER

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Fort Lancaster, Crockett County,  (Western) Texas

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Four pages; Feb. 1, 1862

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:

Locations: University of Houston (original); The Texas Newspaper Project, Center for American History (microfilm), University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX

Weekly Gazette (UT, 1868)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  American Fork,  Utah County, Utah

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  At least 12 issues; No. 12, ca. March 11, 1868

Size and Format:  Pen and ink manuscript

Editor/Publisher:  R. G. Eccles

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The Salt Lake Telegraph,March 11, 1868, reported:  “From American Fork.  We are pleased to receive number 12 of the American Fork Weekly Gazette, edited by Brother R.G. Eccles.  It is published in neat manuscript.  Its pages are filled with instructive and interesting matter, comprehending the scientific, useful, and amusing, such as: ‘An Essay on Astronomy; Original Poetry by J. Crystal; Local Items; Wit and Humor; and Various Selected Matter.'”

The telegraph opened in American Fork. Nov. 20, 1867

July 20, 1868–President Brigham. Young organized a theological school in American Fork for the region.  (George F. Shelley)

According to the University of Utah,

“American Fork first got a newspaper in 1868. The Weekly Gazette was written in pen-and-ink manuscript, and included items like “Original Poetry,” “An Essay on Astronomy,” and “Wit and Humor” before folding after about 12 editions. The American Fork Independent debuted in March 1890. It provided coverage of Utah’s mining industry for the next two years. Other American Fork newspapers included the Item, an “Independent Weekly,” which survived for less than three years, and The Advance, which succumbed after just 12 weeks in 1901.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 18-20; George F. Shelley, Early History of American Fork, American Fork City, 1945

Links: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058027/

Locations:  None; cited in Salt Lake Telegraph, March 11, 1868

Weekly Critic (MB, 1875)

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WEEKLY CRITIC

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Fort Dufferin, Manitoba, Canada

Frequency:  Weekly (title)?  Actual duration and frequency unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1875

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Two North West Mounted Police officers, Wyld and Gilkinson

Title Changes and Continuation:  See Swan River Daily Police News

General Description and Notes:

According to Loveridge, the Dufferin Weekly Critic and the Swan River Daily Police News represented the first efforts at rural journalism at Swan River and Fort Dufferin by North West Mounted Police in 1875 and 1876.  These may have been the earliest Manitoba newspapers outside Winnipeg.  Loveridge calls them “newsletters” and distinguishes them from “true newspapers.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  D.M. Loveridge, A Historical Directory of Manitoba Newspapers, 1859-1978 (Winnipeg:  University of Manitoba Press, 1978), pp. 5, 58

Locations:  Legislative Library, Culture, Heritage and Citizenship, Manitoba, Winnipeg; cited in Manitoba Free Press, March 1, 1875

The Washington Shark (IA, 1850-1854)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Washington, Washington County, Iowa

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  1850-ca. 1854

Size and Format:  “A folio with regular columns of ordinary size, tolerably fine pen type, published on the four sides of one sheet of cap paper”

Editor/Publisher:  Nathan Littler and Richard B. McMillan

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

In his own Washington County history, editor Littler described The Washington Shark as “a folio with regular columns of ordinary size, tolerably fine pen type, published on the four sides of one sheet of cap paper.”  The paper used pseudonyms frequently in its reports and the editors apparently tried to keep their own names a secret.  Littler says the paper contained “general news and current literature,” market reports, advertisements and society news.  The editor notes that it appeared only one copy at a time, so wide distribution did not occur.  Instead, readership was limited to those who could meet in public gathering places.

The Shark was put into the mail box when none were present.  It was directed to some one whom the editors felt would give it the widest publicity.  Usually, when the paper came, its owner would go the most frequented store in town, and taking his seat on a stool or mail keg, would proceed to read to the crowd that quickly assembled, the contents, advertisements and all.

Littler claims the paper appeared frequently, and when it did it was the “sensation of the town until its contents became familiar to all the citizens.”  If most “readers” were amused by the paper’s wit and satire, not all appreciated its occasional bite.

Some, however, to whom the jokes and caricatures fit most closely, were outrageously vexed and the only reason the editors were not punished corporeally at least, was the fact that they were safely incognito.

Littler says the Shark would attack “any and everything going on to which the editors were opposed or which was opposed to the best interests of the community.”

Apparently other handwritten papers were published in the area on the model ofThe Shark.  Notes Littler:  “Occasionally afterwards, other papers of a similar character came out, but none of them achieved the popularity of the Shark.”

Littler served as constable of Washington in 1850, the year the Shark first appeared.  In 1852 he was elected justice of the peace and served in that post until he moved to the town of Richmond, Iowa.  He returned to Washington in 1869 and wrote a history of the county which was serialized in the local paper.

McMillan (1823-1898) lived in Washington from 1846 to 1855.  During that period he was a county assessor and township clerk.  While editing the Shark, McMillan’s brother, Horace Greeley McMillan, lived with him.  The year Richard died Horace purchased the Cedar Rapids Republican, and he eventually owned two Iowa dailies and a weekly farm paper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Nathan Littler, History of Washington County, 1835-1875, ed. by Edna Jones (Washington, Iowa:  Jonathan C. Clark, 1977), 186-187; Roy Alden Atwood, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Iowa Frontier, 1844-1854,”Journalism History, 7:2 (Summer 1980), 56-59, 66-67

Locations:  None

Tuli Times (ZIM, 1891)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Tuli, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia); “established on July 1st, 1890, by the Pioneer Column itself and by ‘A’ Troop of the British South Africa Company’s Police. This fort was first named Fort Selous, after the hunter, explorer and then guide to the Column. The hill on which the fort was built stands less than a mile south of the Shashi River in a hollow basin surrounded by higher hills—its siting was therefore frequently criticised for it was vulnerable to long-range guns and even rifles, a necessary consideration with regard to any threat from the Transvaal Republic”  (from Our Rhodesian Heritage).

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: Circa July, 1891

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to Rhodesiana (Vol. 12, September 1965 and republished on the Our Rhodesian Heritage website), from 1890 to 1893 the fort at Tuli was the main entry to Rhodesia and a small town rapidly grew up at the foot of the fort. It was the head of the telegraph, and here the first hospital in Rhodesia was started by Mother Patrick and her Dominican Sisters on April 1st, 1891. By July, 1891, Tuli even boasted its own newspaper, the Tuli Times. Rhodes reached Tuli in October, 1890, on his way to Mashonaland but the rains ended his journey there. Lord Randolph Churchill, Sir Frederick Carrington, Jameson and Beit were all entertained in the fort in July, 1891, while the large numbers of wagons and new immigrants, streaming north, had to replenish their supplies at Tuli and provided the few stores and the British South Africa Company’s Commissariat Officer with exorbitant profits. In 1893 Tuli was the base from which the Southern Column marched on Bulawayo but thereafter it declined for the Tati-Mangwe road now provided a more direct route to Bulawayo and then on to Salisbury.

Vann and VanArsdel cite the Tuli Times as handwritten and cyclostyled.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 291; Press Reference-Zimbabwe; Louis W. Bolze, “The Book Publishing Scene in Zimbabwe,” The African Book Publishing Record, 6:3-4 (1980), 229–236

Link:  Our Rhodesian Heritage

Locations:  None

Swan River Daily Police News (MB, 1876)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Swan River, Manitoba, Canada

Frequency:  Daily? Despite the title, actual duration and frequency are unknown

Volume and Issue Data: April 27, 1876

Size and Format:  Variable; one page; 24 x 36 inches; 22 x 32.5 inches

Editor/Publisher:  North West Mounted Police personnel

Title Changes and Continuation:  See also Weekly Critic, Dufferin, Manitoba

General Description and Notes:

According to Loveridge, the Daily Police News and Dufferin Weekly Critic represented the first efforts at rural journalism at Swan River and Fort Dufferin by North West Mounted Police in 1875 and 1876.  These may have been the earliest Manitoba newspapers outside Winnipeg.  Loveridge calls them “newsletters” and distinguishes them from “true newspapers.”

Information Sources:          

Bibliography:  D.M. Loveridge, A Historical Directory of Manitoba Newspapers, 1859-1978 (Winnipeg:  University of Manitoba Press, 1978), pp. 5, 95

Locations:  Legislative Library, Culture, Heritage and Citizenship, Winnipeg, Manitoba; April 27, 1876:  Saskatchewan Archives, Saskatoon, SK, Canada

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