Lyceum Star and Evening Chronicle and Review and Miscellaney (RI, 1833-1836)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Unknown

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1833-1836

Size and Format:  about 400 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Review and Miscellaney

General Description and Notes:

According to manuscripts curator at the Rhode Island Historical Society Cynthia Bendroth, “We never could establish whether it was ever published or distributed since it is in a bound volume.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Manuscripts, The Rhode Island Historical Society Library, Providence, RI

The Little Printing Press (AK, 1953-1957)

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The Little Printing Press (AK, 1953-1957)

Place of Publication: Nome, Alaska

Frequency:  Unknown, 64 issues

Volume and Issue Data: July 15, 1953-July1957

Size and Format:  Handwritten and typed

Editor/Publisher:  Pamela Mandeville Mulvihill (eight years old)

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Little Newsprint

General Description and Notes:

According to the editor in notes written in 1975, The Little Newsprint was begun by Pamela Mandeville Mulvihill in Nome when she was eight years old.  Her mother, Ellen Mulvihill, did the typing and the ran the ditto machine.  Her mother committed the error in the title by changing the name to The Little Printing Press after the first issue.  Pamela did all the writing and dictated to her mother what she should type, including spelling.

The paper appeared irregularly for 64 issues untill about July, 1957.  The reason for starting the paper “has been forgotten,” but the author claims it was an “instant success.”

The Little Printing Press (AK, 1953-1957)

According to Mulvihill, she sold 100 copies for 1 cent each.  I never took tips.  After the paper had been typed and run off the night before (usually very late after many discussions over the news), she would attach her coin changer to her belt and go to main street early Saturday morning.  There was a regular route through various stores and offices which were her regular customers.  The drug store took several which they resold.

She had several regular subscribers throughout Alaska and a few “outside.”  Delegate Bob Bartlett was an occasional reader.  Out of towners were charged only the cost of the paper plus postage–5 cents at the time.  Ads were five cents.  News was collected by simply being a girl growing up in Nome; “I just kept my ears open!” (PMM, Dec. 16, 1975)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations: Alaska State Library

Little Monitor (NC, 1869)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Wilmington, NC

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1869

Size and Format:  Pen and ink journal

Editor/Publisher:  Edward A. Oldham

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

“In 1869 at Wilmington, N. C., so far as it has been possible to ascertain, occurred the initial awakening of amateur journalism in the South. At the age of nine, Edward A. Oldham, who was later to become a leading publisher of newspapers, weekly and daily, and a distinguished columnist and writer, produced his first effort in mimic journalism, a pen-and-ink journal, bearing the title of the Little Monitor, suggested by his having been selected as monitor in a private school, where he was among the youngest pupils. This little make-believe newspaper was issued often enough to intensify the young editor’s ambition to own a real printing press and to print a little paper. He had seen Benjamin S. Wood’s advertisement of the Novelty Press in his monthly copy of the St. Nicholas. In time he managed to earn money enough for the purchase of a press and type equipment, and in 1870 he published the Star of the South, four pages, each page 5 x 7 inches, printing one page at a time. This tiny journal set the pace for Southern boys, North Carolina boys particularly, and in that State there quickly followed the Boys’ Courier from New Born, with James M. Howard, Charles R. Thomas and Owen Guiort, as editors. The last named became a Superior Court judge, and Thomas rose to political prominence and became a Member of Congress from North Carolina for several terms, in the Nineties and later.” (The Early Pioneers of Amateur Journalism (Before 1876))

“WHAT HAS BEEN CHARACTERIZED as “The Mimic Press” had an early start in North Carolina. In 1869, at the age of nine, Edward A. Oldham, of Wilmington, is credited with producing the first “amateur newspaper” — the Little Monitor, a pen and ink folio, followed in 1873 by the Star of the South, miniature and type-set.” (Oldham, History of Early Amateur Journalism in North Carolina)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Links: Edward A. Oldham, History of Early Amateur Journalism in North Carolinahttp://www.thefossils.org/horvat/aj/states/NorthCarolina.htmThe Early Pioneers of Amateur Journalism (Before 1876)  http://www.thefossils.org/horvat/aj/pioneers.htm

Locations:  Unknown

Little Joker (TX, 1866-1869)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Jacksboro, Texas

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Published sometime between 1866 and 1869.

Size and Format:  On foolscap

Editor/Publisher:  H.H. McConnell

Title Changes and Continuation:  Same editor/publisher produced the BIG INJUN at Fort Belknap,Texas and THE GRASSHOPPER at Fort Buffalo, Texas.

General Description and Notes:

According to Whisenhunt, the Jacksboro area had no fewer than four newspapers between 1866 and 1869, although only one was printed.  The editor of all four was H.H. McConnell, a soldier first assigned to Jacksboro, Texas in 1866.  McConnell recounts his journalistic efforts and military experience on the Texas frontier in the Reconstruction period in his autobiography, Five Years a Cavalryman.

Shortly after he arrived in Jacksboro, McConnell and other soldiers published a weekly newspaper, LITTLE JOKER, on foolscap.  The paper circulated among the soldiers at Jacksboro.  The Jacksboro post was temporarily abandoned by the military, and the LITTLE JOKER “was ignominiously packed on a Quartermaster’s house and moved to Fort Belknap.”

At Fort Belknap soon issued another handwritten paper, BIG INJUN, intended for a military audience.  According to McConnell, “Here the genius of the editor again broke forth, and the ‘Big Injun’ for a time shed an undying lustre on the literature of the nineteenth century.”  The paper was short-lived:  “Like a meteor flashing along the midnight sky–brilliant for a moment, then rendering the darkness more intense–so the ‘Big Injun’ ran its course.”

McConnell’s transfer to nearby Fort Buffalo Springs marked the publication of his third handwritten, THE GRASSHOPPER.  Like its predecessors, THE GRASSHOPPER was short-lived.  Fort Buffalo Springs was soon abandoned for the more strategic Jacksboro post.

McConnell was finally reassigned to Fort Richardson where he contracted with a Weatherford,Tex.printer to publish The Flea.  This, his first printed newspaper, appeared Feb. 1, 1869, but lasted only six issues, until June 15, 1869.

According the Whisenut, McConnell’s handwritten papers did little more than provide diversion for the soldiers at their respective military posts, but “this was important.  Their very existence also implies that the life of the frontier soldier was mostly a monotonous existence despite the legend and aura of romance that surrounds the United States Cavalry.”

Information Sources:                   

Bibliography:  H.H. McConnell, Five Years a Cavalryman (Jacksboro, Texas:  J.N. Rogers and Co., 1889), p. 174; Donald W. Whisenhunt, “The Frontier Newspaper:  A Guide to Society and Culture,” Journalism Quarterly, 45:4 (Winter 1968), 727; see also Theronne Thompson, “Fort Buffalo Springs, Texas, Border Post,” West Texas Historical Association Yearbook, 36:168 (October 1960).

Location:  None

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

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Litte Joker (SK, 1888 )

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada

Frequency:

Volume and Issue Data:  Twelve issues; June-Dec. 1888

Size and Format:  11 x 17 inches

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Saskatchewan Archives Board has 70 pp. of this manuscript newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Saskatchewan Archives Board, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

Litte Joker (SK, 1888)

Little Joker (SK, )

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

The Little Girls’ Magazine (UT, 1879)

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Little Girls Magazine (UT, 1879)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: St. George, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.1, No. 3, Nov. 12, 1879

Size and Format:  7.75 x 12.5 inches; one col.; pen and ink; 13 pp.

Editor/Publisher:  J.A. Ivins, editor (1879), on behalf of the Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association

Title Changes and Continuation:  Preceded by The Young Ladies Diadem

General Description and Notes:

The paper’s motto was “Perseverance conquers all things.”  The pages are filled with moralistic encouragement for young girls to have proper manners, to look for men who are moral and honest, to exercise their intellectual abilities (not to be idle), etc.

Several items are addressed “to the little girls of our association.”  Vol. 1, No. 3, includes two editorials, True Nobility, House-keeping, Kindness, Letters from Aunt Lou, Good Manners, Prayer, Cheerfulness, My Attendance at these meetings, To [sic] Late, and Cheerfulness at Home.

The stories appear to have been written by the young girls of the mutual improvement association and some of the elder women advisers.

Information Sources:               

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City, UT (Mss A 1052)

The Little Chief (OK, 1899)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Darlington, Oklahoma

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan., 1899-Vol. 1, No. 3, Feb., 1899

Size and Format:  Four page, two columns, handwritten and mimeographed

Editor/Publisher:  Rev. W.M. Wellman, pastor, Cheyenne and Arapaho Indians Congregational Mission (1899)

Title Changes and Continuations:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, The Little Chief served as the mission’s promotional paper.  It was “devoted to the interests of the Christian work now being done among the Cheyenne and Arapahoe Indians in general and to the Congregational Mission in particular.”  The paper contained appeals to donors outside the mission community and reported the “progress” of the Indians toward Christianity.  The paper also published tribal statistics, church news, inspirational statements and other news of activities related to the mission community.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian andAlaskaNative Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 247-248

Locations:  OkMuB-J

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