The Nutshell (MA, no date)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: East Marshfield, MA

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: Unknown

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  American Antiquarian Society,  Worcester, MA

The Nugget (ZIM, 1890)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Victoria, Mashonaland, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia)

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: November 11, 1890

Size and Format: In manuscript; motto: “Root hog or bust”

Editor/Publisher: H.R. Vennell

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to the British South Africa Company Historical Catalogue and Souvenir of Rhodesia, Empire Exhibition, 1936-1937,

   “273. First Newspaper, Mashonaland. – The Nugget, with the motto Root hog or bust, produced in manuscript at Fort Victoria, 11th November, 1890 (two months after the occupation of Mashonaland). The Editor says frankly that his principal object was to be the first in the field of journalism in the country. Printed and published by H. R. Vennell at the Nugget Publishing Company’s works, Fort Victoria, Mashonaland. No price is mentioned.

– Government Archives, Salisbury”

Information Sources: 

Bibliography:  British South Africa Company Historical Catalogue and Souvenir of Rhodesia, Empire Exhibition, 1936-1937 (1937); Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 290; Press Reference-Zimbabwe; Louis W. Bolze, “The Book Publishing Scene in Zimbabwe,” The African Book Publishing Record, 6:3-4 (1980), 229–236

Locations:  None

Norwoodiana (Eng-Aus, 1867)

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Norwoodiana (Eng-Aus, 1867)

Norwoodiana (Eng-Aus, 1867)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Aboard the ship Norwood on its journey from England to Western Australia with convicts, April 27 (date of first issue) to July 6, 1867

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  “Introduction” issue, April 27, 1867

Size and Format:  See image of the front page of April 27, 1867

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Convict shipboard paper en route from England to Western Australia. Irwin’s published account includes it as “Norwoodiana, or, Sayings and doings on route to Western Australia : a manuscript journal made during the 1867 voyage of the convict ship Norwood, April 27 to July 6, 1867.

Information Sources:                            

Bibliography: William Irvin, Journals on board the convict ships Palmerston, 1861, Belgravia, 28th Apr. 1866-23rd June, 1866 and Norwood, 27th Apr.-6th July, 1867 [microform], reproduction of typescript; transcribed by Bob & Tops Dent 1996 with permission of the Mitchell Library from the original manuscript held by the NSW State Library.

Locations:  State Library of Western Australia; thanks to Annette Delbianco of the SLWA.

Noilpum (CA, 1857-1858)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Hay Fork, Trinity County, California (ca. 1857-1858)

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Unknown

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown (Isaac Cox?)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Kennedy notes that “except for a manuscript paper called the Noilpum, published at Hay Fork, all of Trinity County’s early newspapers were printed at Weaverville.  At most, only a very few copies may have been produced, and none are extant.

Isaac Cox reported in his history of Trinity County published in 1858,

We have named the “Noilpum” without spreading ourselves into explanatory easings, but now it comes.  It is the Hay Fork newspaper, an institution to absorb and assimilitate the literary exudations not otherwise provided for; a newspaper which, if presented to a Faust or Guttenberg of our day, would soon learn to know the “devil,” which again in all probability would cause relief in the tar and pitch market, the only operators in that commodity at present being the brokers of the squaw boudoirs.  The Noilpum is a goodly paper, and though it advocates the Administration in order not to hurt its books, would go dead downright for Jackson and Douglas in the question of “honest opinion.”   A paper is “ably” conducted, knowing nothing of Hoe and Co.’s Mammoth Cylinder, Anti-Friction, anti, etc. presses, or any other sleight-of-hand exponent of public greasing, being thus thrown back on pen and ink, will naturally get muddy and greasy enough to answer to the “mudsill” call and the pet name of printers’ cordiality, “dirty sheet.”  We may guess now you know what the “Noilpum” is.

Kennedy speculates that the Noilpum may have been a humorous paper (despite the lame attempt at humor above).

Information Sources:                        

Bibliography:  Isaac Cox, The Annals of Trinity County (San Francisco:  Commercial Book and Job Steam Printing, 1858), 125;  Chester P. Kennedy, “Newspapers of the California Northern Mines, 1850-1860–A Record of Life, Letters and Culture,” unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford, 1949, pp. 30-31, 39, 289, 574-75, and 603)

Locations:  None located

The Night Blooming Cereus (NS, 1869-1871)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Pugwash, Nova Scotia, Canada (a small village on the north shore.)

Frequency:  Semi-monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  From Nov. 1869 to Mar. 1871

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

It was the official organ of the Literary Association in Nova Scotia, devoted to science, poetry and art.

Information Sources:                

Bibliography:  “Flashback” (column), The Chronicle-Herald, June 15, 1964, p. 24.  Newspaper Library, Public Archives of Nova Scotia, 6016 University Avenue, Halifax, NS

Locations: North Cumberland Historical Society, Pugwash, Nova Scotia; Special Collections, Dalhousie University Library, Halifax, NS, Canada

Neya Powagans (AB, 1991-present?)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Frequency: Bimonthly

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, February, 1992

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Geoff Burtonshaw (2324-3rd Ave. NW, Calgary)

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:          

This paper describes itself as a “Metis Newsletter.” According the Glenbow Museum, the editor, R. Geoffrey Burtonshaw, 1916- , was born on a farm near Valpoy, Manitoba. He moved to Calgary, Alberta in 1952 and worked as a carpenter until he retired in 1981. He subsequently became interested in Metis genealogy and collected a vast amount of information on the subject.

In the spring of 1991, he started Neya Powagans: The Metis Newsletter, a bi-monthly publication. He also assembles a Metis Researcher contact list and hosts Metis Research Nights at his house. At present he answers up to 700 written enquiries a year on Metis genealogy. He also volunteers on a regular basis at the Glenbow Museum, assisting Metis genealogy researchers.

Unclear from online sources and given the age of the editor if the paper is still published.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Link: Glenbow Museum, Calgary, AB

Locations: Neya Powagans: The Metis Newsletter, 2324 – 3rd Ave. N.W.  Calgary, AB, Canada; Manitoba Genealogical Society Library, Winnipeg, Manitoba; Glenbow Museum and Archives, Calgary, Alberta

The New Moon (MO, 1842)

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The New Moon, MO, 1842

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Jefferson City or Arrow Rock, MO

Frequency: Unknown (one issue?)

Volume and Issue Data: February 23, 1842

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

According to the Missouri Historical Society, “The New Moon was a mock newspaper sent to Miss Missouri I. Ewing of Jefferson City, MO, from an unknown ‘publisher.’  A unique issue, it provides an entertaining news account of an excursion from Jefferson City to a point new [sic] Arrow Rock, MO, for a country wedding.

According to Jolliffe and Whitehouse, The New Moon “was probably not a continuing, circulated publication”  and “it appears that the entire issue satirizes a single event–a wedding.” They conclude that the paper was “a single copy of an amusing feminist newsletter.”

Information Sources:                           

Bibliography: Lee Jolliffe and Virginia Whitehouse, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Frontier? The Prevalence Problem, ” paper presented at the AEJMC History Division Mid-Year Meeting, Columbia, MO, 1994.

Locations:  Edwards Family Papers, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO

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