The Potters Wheel (MO, 1904-1907)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: St. Louis, MO

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  15 issues, 1904-1907

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  The Potters, a group of St. Louis women artists and writers who issued this monthly magazine

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

“A single copy of the magazine was hand-lettered and hand-illustrated by the Potters. It contained a variety of artistic output, including poetry and prose, photographs, calligraphy artwork, and needlework.  Comprised of young women in their late teens and early twenties, the Potters included poet Sara Teasdale, artists Caroline Risque and Petronelle Sombart, photographers Grace and Williamina Parrish, and writers Vine Colby, Inez Dutro, Celia Harris, Edna Wahlert and Guida Richey.  Their mentor, Lillie Rose Ernst, was a botany teacher at Central High School [and later an administrator with the St. Louis Public School System], and she alternately encouraged and challenged them.  The Potters went their various ways after 1907, some of them to marry, others for further study or to actively pursue careers in distant places.

The collection contains poems, short stories, watercolor prints, photographs–mostly portraits, various hand-painted designs, plays, fabric covered designs, and photographs of sculptures.

Information Sources:                   

Bibliography: None

Locations:  The Potters Wheel Collection, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO; three issues  in the Yale University Collection of American Literature, Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, New Haven,CT

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The New Moon (MO, 1842)

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The New Moon, MO, 1842

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Jefferson City or Arrow Rock, MO

Frequency: Unknown (one issue?)

Volume and Issue Data: February 23, 1842

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

According to the Missouri Historical Society, “The New Moon was a mock newspaper sent to Miss Missouri I. Ewing of Jefferson City, MO, from an unknown ‘publisher.’  A unique issue, it provides an entertaining news account of an excursion from Jefferson City to a point new [sic] Arrow Rock, MO, for a country wedding.

According to Jolliffe and Whitehouse, The New Moon “was probably not a continuing, circulated publication”  and “it appears that the entire issue satirizes a single event–a wedding.” They conclude that the paper was “a single copy of an amusing feminist newsletter.”

Information Sources:                           

Bibliography: Lee Jolliffe and Virginia Whitehouse, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Frontier? The Prevalence Problem, ” paper presented at the AEJMC History Division Mid-Year Meeting, Columbia, MO, 1994.

Locations:  Edwards Family Papers, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO

The Juggernaut (MO, 1930-1933)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Springfield, Missouri

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  Three extant issues: October 20, 1930; March 5, 1932; October 5, 1933.

Size and Format:  Round-robin family newspaper

Editor/Publisher:  The Wright family

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Circulated among friends and relatives in Mount Vernon, IL, Chicago, and St. Louis.  Included family news, humor, and commentary.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Ruth Wright Collection, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO

The Gas Light (MO, 1850)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Keytesville, MO

Frequency:  Unknown, published sporadically for nearly a year

Volume and Issue Data: Started June 1850

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  “Timothy Timbertoes” and “Samuel Sugarstick” (pseudonyms)

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

 According to the History of Howard and Chariton Counties, the paper professed to be “neutral in religion and politics.” The writers made fun of local leaders and gave satirical accounts of quilting parties, shooting matches and weddings.

According to Jolliffe and Whitehouse, “This publication cannot be named a ‘newspaper,’ given the lack of information about it.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Lee Jolliffe and Virginia Whitehouse, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Frontier? The Prevalence Problem, ” paper presented at the AEJMC History Division Mid-Year Meeting, Columbia, MO, 1994; History of Howard and Chariton Counties, Missouri (St. Louis: National Historical Company, 1883), p. 511.

Locations:  None

Alma Courier (MO, 1880s)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Alma, Missouri

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1880s

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to Jolliffee and Whitehouse, the Alma Courier was “reportedly a community paper emanating from the Alma Public School in the early 1880s.” They report that “it was published frequently and regularly, included a variety of news stories in each issue, and displayed a recognizable title and format.”

Local historian Garrison notes that the paper was “all written by hand on good quality of essay paper and tied at the top with pink and blue silk ribbons.” It included area and school news, editorials and small advertisements.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Lee Jolliffe and Virginia Whitehouse, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Frontier? The Prevalence Problem, ” paper presented at the AEJMC History Division Mid-Year Meeting, Columbia, MO, 1994; Milton Garrison, A History of Alma (privately published, 1936), Harvey J. Higgins Historical Society, Higginsville, MO.

Locations:  None

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