The Shushana News (AK, no date)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Chisana, Alaska

Frequency:  Daily, but irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Unknown

Size and Format:  Ledger sheets

Editor/Publisher:  “A placer miner named McGillicuddy” (Davis, 1976)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to Davis, a placer miner named McGillicuddy issued the Shushana News from a cabin eight miles from his nearest neighbor.  He owned the only radio in the area and would take notes of broadcasts, then rewrite his notes on ledger sheets.  A dog at a camp eight miles away had been trained to fetch McGillicuddy’s daily and return it to the camp.  McGillicuddy handed the paper to the dog, neatly rolled in a strong wrapper, and the newsdog would return to its master at the camp with the latest radio news reports.  The dog’s master would then post the paper where everyone else in the camp could read it.  On at least one occasion, the dog returned without the paper, but was punished and produced the missing paper.

Information Sources:                 

Bibliography:  Phyllis Davis, A Guide to Alaska’s Newspapers (Juneau, Alaska:  Gastineau Channel Centennial Association and Alaska Division of  State Libraries and Museums, 1976), p 14.

Locations:  No copies located

The Scorpion (NV, 1857)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Genoa (Mormon Station), Nevada

Frequency:  Probably monthly

Volume and Issue Data: Feb. 1, 1857-ca.Dec. 1857

Size and Format:  12 columns, with illustrations; written in “a large, bold hand”

Editor/Publisher:  Stephen A. Kinsey

Title Changes and Continuations:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to Lingenfelter and Gash, The Scorpion was the second handwritten newspaper produced in Nevada, following the lead of Joseph Webb’s Gold Canon Switch (ca. 1854).  The paper carried the motto:  “Fear no man, and do justice to all.”  The monthly publication reportedly contained 12 columns of stories and illustrations, including caricatures.  The paper said it would “contain a full and extensive digest of all the current news and discussions of the day,” and that “nothing which can interest the general reader will be omitted.”

Lingenfelter and Gash speculate that “the paper probably died before its twelfth number,” a year before the first printed paper, the Territorial Enterprise, appeared in the Nevada territory.  The Enterprise reported April 12, 1871 under the headline, “A Curiosity,” that the paper had been shown a copy of The ScorpionThe Enterprise reported that the July 1, 1857 issue of The Scorpion was written in “a large, bold hand.”

Information Sources

Bibliography:  Bob Karolevitz, “Pen and Ink Newspapers of the Old West,” Frontier Times, 44:2 (Feb.-Mar., 1970), 31; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 115; Jake Highton, Nevada Newspaper Days:  A History of Journalism in the Silver State (Stockton, Calif.:  Heritage West Books, 1990), pp. 2; Dan De Quille, The Big Bonanza (New York:  Alfred A. Knopf, 1947); see also, Territorial Enterprise, April 12, 1871; Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), p. 47; Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984), p. 89.

Locations:  None

Scorpion (CA, 1857)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Placerville, California

Frequency: One known issue

Volume and Issue Data: 1857

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

According to Kennedy, the paper may have been humorous.

“The Scorpion was a manuscript paper which roused the ire of a contributor of the Mountain Democrat.  In a letter published in that paper on March 27, 1857, the contributor, who signed herself “Manta,” violently belabored the Scorpion.  It seems to have been a scandal sheet, published by a group of men who resented the refusal of some young women to dance with them.  If the Scorpion was any more venomous than the women who described it, it must have been one of the most poisonous papers on record.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Kennedy, Newspapers of California North Mines, 524

Locations: Unknown

Potosi Nix Cum Rouscht (NV, 1861)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Potosi, Nevada (then in northwest New Mexico Territory)

Frequency:  Not more than one or two issues

Volume and Issue Data:  Late Feb. 1861

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Capt. J.E. Stevens, aka “Man about the Mill”

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Lingenfelter and Gash, editor Stevens started this manuscript paper in late Feb. 1861 so as “not to be outdone by Talbott’s Miner’s Voice.”  Stevens was the president of the Colorado Mining Company and founder of Potosi.  The editor said the paper was “printed” at Las Vegas station and “published at Potosi.”  The paper probably did not last beyond the first issue.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), p. 119; Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 67; Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984), p. 171.

Locations:  No issues located, but Feb. 19, 1861 issue (Vol. 1, No. 1) quoted in Los Angeles Star, March 9, 1861.

Pine Grove and Rockland Star (NV, 1872)

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See Pine Grove Burlesque

Pine Grove Chronicle (NV, 1872)

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See Pine Grove Burlesque

Pine Grove Burlesque (NV, 1872)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Pine Grove, Lyon County, Nevada

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  1872

Size and Format:  Written in a single bound volume

Editor/Publisher:  Pine Grove (and Rockland) Lyceum

Title Changes and Continuation:  Also titles of Esmeralda Sun, Pine Grove and Rockland Star, Pine Grove Chronicle, and Pick and Shovel.

General Description and Notes:

The lyceum members of Pine Grove, a mining camp in Lyon County, produced a manuscript newspaper containing literary items and local news in 1872.  Irregularly appearing as the Pine Grove BurlesqueEsmeralda Sun, Pine Grove and Rockland Star, Pine Grove Chronicle, and Pick and Shovel, the papers were written in a single bound journal and reportedly was kept on the counter of a general store owned by the Wilson family, (William Wilson make the initial gold discovery at Pine Grove), where local citizens could read it.

The bound journal records news of the Pine Grove-Rockland area at a time when neither community had a printed newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  “Pine Grove Lyceum Papers,” Nevada Historical Society Quarterly, XXIX: 3 (Fall 1985), pp. 221-222.

Locations:  Nevada Historical Society

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