Star of the West (IL, 1859)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Rockford, IL: Union High School

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1859, Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6.

Size and Format:  (in numerical order) 14 pp., 19 pp., 16 pp., 15 pp., 32 pp. and 24 pp.

Editor/Publisher: Variable

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

All issues of this paper are bound in one volume.  Some pages are torn while others have ink so light that they are difficult to read.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Union High School, No. 2 (BV), Rockford, IL, in  Manuscripts, Illinois State Historical Library, Old State Capitol, Springfield, IL

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The Souvenir (NY, no date)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Rivermouth and Sunboro, NY

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: Unknown

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Newspapers and Periodicals, American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA

The Soldier Weekly-News (ID, 1893)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Soldier, Idaho

Frequency:  Weekly (monthly?)

Volume and Issue Data:  Two issues extant:  Vol. 1, No. 1, Jan. 13, 1893, and No. 2? Feb 10, 1893

Size and Format:  8 x 13 inches; one column; two pages

Editor/Publisher:  Soldier Literary Society

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The paper’s motto, written just below the title, on both extant copies is “Hew to the line, let chips fall where they may.”  The first issue states that “in obedience to the gracious request of the Soldier Literary Society, we assume the publication of a paper in promoting the interests of that Society, and will present our first number this evening, under the title of the ‘Soldier Weekly News.'”

“We make our editorial bow on the sea of journalism, with some misgivings as to our untried ability to please all, but with the aid of the members of this Society and an earnest effort on our part, we hope to issue weekly, a journal which may interest and amuse each and every member of this Society.

“In politics the news will be strictly independent.

“Contributions, other than objectional or personally abusive articles, solicited from members of the Society.  Any article calculated to injure the feelings of any member of our Society or any citizen of our place will not be accepted.  As many of the ‘home staff’ possess decided talent in the journalistic line, we may expect newsy and interesting contributions.  Having secured a corps of able correspondents we promise our readers the cream of legislative news from Boise, as well as events of interest in all (remainder of line illegible)” (from page one, first issue, Jan. 13, 1893).

The extant copies contain “Local News” shorts, “Notes from neighboring places,” appeals for advertisements and an obituary.

The “Notes from neighboring places” section of the Feb. 10 issue begins, “Telegrams from up the Creek.”

The Feb. 10 issue notes, “We are pleased to record that the circulation of the ‘Soldier Weekly-News‘ is rapidly increasing and advertisements coming in liberally.  It affords us much pleasure to see our paper thus appreciated.  We entertain the ambition ere the close of 1893 of securing the largest circulation of any paper in Idaho.

“We are not giving to our readers a larger amount of news, local and foreign than any paper in Idaho (sic) the state.”

Information Sources:                                                                  

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Idaho State Historical Society, Boise, ID

Soldier’s Letter: Second Colorado Cavalry (KS, 1864-1865)

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SOLDIER’S LETTER:  SECOND COLORADO CAVALRY

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Kansas City and Fort Riley, Kansas

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, Nos. 1-50, 1864-1865

Size and Format:  7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in.; four pages, four columns; pages 1, 2, and 4 were printed, but page 3 was blank for individual soldiers to make personal comments or statements

Editor/Publisher:  Printed content’s editor and proprietor, Oliver V. Wallace

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The Soldier’s Letter was a regimental paper published between 1864 and 1865 for the Second Colorado Cavalry:  “A Regimental Paper–To Accompany the Regiment.”  The paper was priced at 10 cents per single copy.  The paper’s motto, “The Flag We Fight Under,” was accompanied by a Union flag graphic.

Published at Kansas City and Fort Riley, Kansas, the printed pages included poetry, history and specific military news items.  Letters were also included, as were extracts from the Journal of Commerce, Illustrated News, and Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.  Several items discussed aspects of the Civil War.  Letters from Fort Larned, Kansas, described problems with Indian attacks and illnesses.

The blank pages contained the comments and statements of soldiers in the regiment.  The handwritten pages included news items, poetry and proverbs.  Vol. 1, No. 20, dated March 18, 1865, addresses “Young Men.”  They are encouraged to maintain high morals and to take as their “motto:  self-reliance, honesty and industry.”

Information Sources:                                                                      

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Western History Department, Denver Public Library, Denver, CO

The Society Cat (MA, 1919-1920)

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THE SOCIETY CAT

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Unknown

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1919-20

Size and Format:  approximately 20 pp.

Editor/Publisher:  Hale Family

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Children’s project.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College Library, Northampton, MA

The Snowbound (NV, 1890)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  On Southern Pacific Railroad near Reno

Frequency:  Irregular daily, “every week-day afternoon”

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.1, No. 1, Jan. 31, 1890-Feb.1890?

Size and Format:  Four pages; outside pages were printed in blue ink, inside pages were written in pencil; manila paper.

Editor/Publisher:  “S.P. Prisoner in Car No. 36, blockaded at Reno, Nevada,” aka George T. McCully

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The Snowbound, as its names suggests, appeared after a blizzard blocked the pass routes through the Sierra Nevadas for 600 passengers aboard a Southern Pacific train.  According to Lingenfelter, passenger George T. McCully “sought to relieve the anxious weeks of waiting by printing a newspaper for his fellow passengers.”  Highton claims, however, that the printer of The Snowbound was unknown and that the paper printed before the train left Reno Jan. 30, although it was dated Jan. 31.

In any case, the first number of The Snowbound aspired to be “issued every week-day afternoon by S.P. Prisoner in Car No. 36, blockaded at Reno, Nevada” as “A Souvenir of the Sierra Nevada Blockade 1890.”  It was both printed and handwritten:  the outside pages were printed in blue ink; the inside pages were written in pencil.  It is not known if the paper continued after its first number.

“The Two Inside Pages”–contain the matter which appeared in original issue of “THE SNOWBOUND” published on manilla paper and written with lead pencil.  The outside pages were made up to complete a four page paper, which we take pleasure to issue, at the request of the passengers as a souvenir of the blockade.  in addition to regular copies, we present them with one “proof” copy on plate paper…. (p.4)

“The editor [thanks] the Reverend William Appel, messrs. L.W. Harmons, P.S. Heffleman, Ernest Block, H.K. Pratt and others who kindly assisted to make entertaining to those especially who were in the blockade, the columns of our little souvenir, “THE SNOWBOUND.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Phillip I. Earl, “Unique newspaper born of 1890 snow blockade in Reno,” Sparks Tribune, Nov. 30, 1983, p. 4; Jake Highton, Nevada Newspaper Days:  A History of Journalism in the Silver State (Stockton, Calif.:  Heritage West Books, 1990), pp. 97;  Richard E. Lingenfelter, The Newspapers of Nevada (San Francisco:  John Howell-Books, 1964), 72-73; Richard E. Lingenfelter and Karen R. Gash, The Newspapers of Nevada (Reno:  University of Nevada Press, 1984).  (p.4, col.2) in article “SP No.38”–“…N.J. Weaver correspondent of the New York Herald, has done his part towards enlightening the world, giving the Herald  three solid columns of our misery.”

Locations: Jan. 31, 1890:  CHi; CSmH; CU-B; NvHi

Smithfield Sunday School Gazette (UT, 1869)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Smithfield, UT

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 2, Nos. 1-6, Oct. 24-Nov. 28, 1869

Size and Format:  2.5 columns on 8.5”x14” lined paper, one issue with an extra 8”x10” and another with a 5”x7” poem

Editor/Publisher:  Louisa L. Greene

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Motto:  “Remember Thy Creator in the Days of thy Youth.”

The manuscript paper, Smithfield Sunday School Gazette, was a weekly paper edited from Oct. 24 to Nov. 28, 1869, by Louisa L. Greene, who later became founding editor of the Woman’s Exponent, a Mormon publication for women.  The Exponent was never an organ of the Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Association, as the authors of The Story of the Latter-day Saints state on p. 336.

Copies of the Smithfield paper for the above dates are in the archives of the Mormon Church Historical Library in Salt Lake City.  Content of the papers included news of Sunday School members and of the community, with some literary efforts by the editor and her helpers.  The paper was distributed at Sunday School meetings.  Greene would have been about 20 years old in 1869.

(The above information was provided by Prof. Sherilyn Cox Bennion, Humboldt State University, Arcata, California)

According to the Olsons, the Sunday School was organized in Smithfield on Sunday, April 15, 1866, with Francis Sharp as superintendent.  There were 69 pupils in eight classes, with a teacher for each group….(40)

The Sunday School took charge of the May Day celebrations, the July celebrations, edited the Smithfield Sunday School Gazette, opened the first library there, and in general played an active part in the life of the Mormon community.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  James Allen and Glen Leonard, The Story of the Latter-Day Saints (Historical Department of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Deseret Book Co., 1976), p. 336; Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Olson, eds., The History of Smithfield [Utah] (Smithfield:  City of Smithfield, 1927), pp.40-43

Locations:  Mormon Church Historical Library Archives, Salt Lake City, Utah (Ms D 2918, Box 17, fd 17)

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