The Weekly News (PA, 1902-1906)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Pennsylvania

Frequency: Weekly (title?)

Volume and Issue Data: 85 pages total, ca. 1902-1906

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Christopher Morley (1890-1957)

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

One of five student newspapers in the Morley Family Papers.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  The Morley Collection, Manuscripts, The Quaker Collection, Haverford College, Haverford, PA

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The Weekly News. (NC, 1860-1861)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Harrington, NC

Frequency:  Published Thursdays at first June 7-28, 1860), then Tuesday and Thursdays (July 5-31, 1860), then Tuesdays (Aug. 7-June 4, 1861), then Wednesdays (June 12, 1861-March 2, 1864).

Volume and Issue Data:  According to Smith, 182 numbers (153 issues surviving)

Size and Format:  About 9- by 11-inches

Editor/Publisher:  John McLean Harrington

Title Changes and Continuation:  See also The Times and other Harrington papers

General Description and Notes:

According to Smith, the Weekly News. contained traditional newspaper content. The paper included politics, poetry, local election results, and other general news items.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Michael Ray Smith, A Free Press in Freehand(Grand Rapids, MI: Edenridge Press, 2011). Additional bibliographic information about this and other Harrington papers contained in Smith;  “Handwritten Newspaper Was Published in Western Harnett,” Harnett County News, February 3, 1944, front page story; Malcom Fowler, They Passed this Way, (Harnett County Centennial, 1955), see Chapter XVII, “Authors, Poets and Papers”, pp. 150-52. In the Harrington Papers is an article dated 1944, “Unique state Newspaper Found in Files at Duke”.  No dates or page numbers for the article are viewable on the copy.

Locations:  John McLean Harrington Papers, Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Perkins Library, Duke University, Durham, NC

The (Weekly) Herald (PA, ca. 1902-1906)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Pennsylvania

Frequency:  Weekly (name?)

Volume and Issue Data: Sometime between 1902 and 1906

Size and Format:  82 pages total

Editor/Publisher:  Christopher Morley

Title Changes and Continuation: The Weekly Herald, sometimes just The Herald

General Description and Notes:

Student newspapers in the Morley Family Papers collection

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  The Morley Family Collection, Manuscripts, The Quaker Collection, Haverford College, Haverford, PA

Weekly Gazette (UT, 1868)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  American Fork,  Utah County, Utah

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  At least 12 issues; No. 12, ca. March 11, 1868

Size and Format:  Pen and ink manuscript

Editor/Publisher:  R. G. Eccles

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The Salt Lake Telegraph,March 11, 1868, reported:  “From American Fork.  We are pleased to receive number 12 of the American Fork Weekly Gazette, edited by Brother R.G. Eccles.  It is published in neat manuscript.  Its pages are filled with instructive and interesting matter, comprehending the scientific, useful, and amusing, such as: ‘An Essay on Astronomy; Original Poetry by J. Crystal; Local Items; Wit and Humor; and Various Selected Matter.'”

The telegraph opened in American Fork. Nov. 20, 1867

July 20, 1868–President Brigham. Young organized a theological school in American Fork for the region.  (George F. Shelley)

According to the University of Utah,

“American Fork first got a newspaper in 1868. The Weekly Gazette was written in pen-and-ink manuscript, and included items like “Original Poetry,” “An Essay on Astronomy,” and “Wit and Humor” before folding after about 12 editions. The American Fork Independent debuted in March 1890. It provided coverage of Utah’s mining industry for the next two years. Other American Fork newspapers included the Item, an “Independent Weekly,” which survived for less than three years, and The Advance, which succumbed after just 12 weeks in 1901.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 18-20; George F. Shelley, Early History of American Fork, American Fork City, 1945

Links: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85058027/

Locations:  None; cited in Salt Lake Telegraph, March 11, 1868

The Weekly Eagle. (NC, 1860)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Pine Forge, NC

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  According to Smith, one issue, the only one that survives; April 20, 1860

Size and Format:  About 9- by 11-inches

Editor/Publisher:  John McLean Harrington

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The paper included politics, poetry, local election results, and other general news items.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Michael Ray Smith, A Free Press in Freehand (Grand Rapids, MI: Edenridge Press, 2011). Additional bibliographic information about this and other Harrington papers contained in Smith.

Locations:  John McLean Harrington Papers, Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Perkins Library, Duke University, Durham, NC

The Washington Shark (IA, 1850-1854)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Washington, Washington County, Iowa

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  1850-ca. 1854

Size and Format:  “A folio with regular columns of ordinary size, tolerably fine pen type, published on the four sides of one sheet of cap paper”

Editor/Publisher:  Nathan Littler and Richard B. McMillan

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

In his own Washington County history, editor Littler described The Washington Shark as “a folio with regular columns of ordinary size, tolerably fine pen type, published on the four sides of one sheet of cap paper.”  The paper used pseudonyms frequently in its reports and the editors apparently tried to keep their own names a secret.  Littler says the paper contained “general news and current literature,” market reports, advertisements and society news.  The editor notes that it appeared only one copy at a time, so wide distribution did not occur.  Instead, readership was limited to those who could meet in public gathering places.

The Shark was put into the mail box when none were present.  It was directed to some one whom the editors felt would give it the widest publicity.  Usually, when the paper came, its owner would go the most frequented store in town, and taking his seat on a stool or mail keg, would proceed to read to the crowd that quickly assembled, the contents, advertisements and all.

Littler claims the paper appeared frequently, and when it did it was the “sensation of the town until its contents became familiar to all the citizens.”  If most “readers” were amused by the paper’s wit and satire, not all appreciated its occasional bite.

Some, however, to whom the jokes and caricatures fit most closely, were outrageously vexed and the only reason the editors were not punished corporeally at least, was the fact that they were safely incognito.

Littler says the Shark would attack “any and everything going on to which the editors were opposed or which was opposed to the best interests of the community.”

Apparently other handwritten papers were published in the area on the model ofThe Shark.  Notes Littler:  “Occasionally afterwards, other papers of a similar character came out, but none of them achieved the popularity of the Shark.”

Littler served as constable of Washington in 1850, the year the Shark first appeared.  In 1852 he was elected justice of the peace and served in that post until he moved to the town of Richmond, Iowa.  He returned to Washington in 1869 and wrote a history of the county which was serialized in the local paper.

McMillan (1823-1898) lived in Washington from 1846 to 1855.  During that period he was a county assessor and township clerk.  While editing the Shark, McMillan’s brother, Horace Greeley McMillan, lived with him.  The year Richard died Horace purchased the Cedar Rapids Republican, and he eventually owned two Iowa dailies and a weekly farm paper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Nathan Littler, History of Washington County, 1835-1875, ed. by Edna Jones (Washington, Iowa:  Jonathan C. Clark, 1977), 186-187; Roy Alden Atwood, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Iowa Frontier, 1844-1854,”Journalism History, 7:2 (Summer 1980), 56-59, 66-67

Locations:  None

Vermont Autograph and Remarker (VT, 1871)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Starksborough,Vermont

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: November 6, 1871

Size and Format:  about 7′ x 4 l/2″

Editor/Publisher:  James Johns

Title Changes and Continuation:  According to the front page story in the Vermont Autograph and Remarker, the editor also wrote the Huntington Gazette when he was 13 years old (March 1810).  He altered the title of this paper “as fancy dictated.”

General Description and Notes:

The paper is very neatly written in scripted print.  On the first page James Johns writes:

“It cannot well escape the notice of an observing eye that the Autograph is, as the title indicates, a manuscript production, being executed with a pen by hand.  consequently it may well be supposed what is the fact, that such a mode of issue does not admit of multiplying copies like the press and types, one at a time being all that I undertake to get out at once.  This I am generally able to accomplish in little more than half a day with close application.  The matter is all written down on the columns directly from the dictates of my mind.  The papers’ so issued I mostly send off by mail to either publishers.”

According to the editor of the Proceedings of the Vermont Historical Society, Vol. IV, No. 2 (New Series), 1936, pp 69-70, the editor of the Autograph, James John was born in Huntington, VT, September 26, 1797.

“As early as 1834, he pen-printed a newspaper, the Vermont Autograph and Remarker; each issue included five or six articles, totaling about fifteen hundred words–every letter printed by hand.  He continued the Autograph until three months before his death [1867, age 76].  His pen-printed material consists of historical items, essays, fiction, poems, and political statistics.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Robert W. G. Vail, “Bibliography of the Writings of James Johns,” Monograph on James Johns [The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America,  Vol. 27, Part 2, 1933]; cited in Proceedings of the Vermont Historical Society, 1936, “James Johns, Vermont Pen Printer,” Vol. IV, No. 2, pages 69-71

Locations: Vermont Historical Society Library, Montpelier, VT;  Newspapers and Periodicals, American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA

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