Philomathean Gazette (UT, 1873)

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Philomathean Gazette (UT, 1873)

Place of Publication: Payson City, Utah County, Utah Territory

Frequency:  “Published every Monday”

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 2, No. 18, Feb. 24, 1873

Size and Format:  8.5 x 14 inches; single column; pen and ink, 8+ pp.

Editor/Publisher:  John Redington, editor

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

The Gazette was “devoted to the interest of the Payson Philomathean Society,” an organization apparently supportive of the Mormon Church and its mission activities.  Vol. 2, No. 18, contains “original poetry” on “The Union of Souls” on pages one and two with an editor’s note: “To [sic] lengthy to publish in full, Ed.”

A story on “Travels on the Islands in the South Pacific Ocean” (pp. 2-5) recounts the efforts of the editor who “was called by the First Presidency of our Church to go on a mission to the South Pacific Islands, to preach the gospel to the inhabitants of that part of the world.”

Another story, “How Mr. Gray became a Farmer,” is continued from the previous issue of the paper, and continues to the issue to follow.

At least two pages are devoted to correspondence (dated Feb. 23) to the editor.  Both letters published refer to the Philomathean Society’s meetings, but provide no details as to its purpose or membership.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Utah State Historical Society, Mss A 2591, Salt Lake City, UT

The Payson Advocate (UT, 1865)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Payson, Utah (ca. 1865)

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  At least 6 issues, ca. 1865

Size and Format:  Approx. 8 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown (also known as The Advocate)

General Description and Notes:

Alter quotes the Deseret News, March 29, 1865:

The Payson Advocate and The Intelligencer.  Manuscript newspapers, 8 pages each, judging from letters, and No. 6 of the Advocate, are proving interesting and beneficial to both writers and readers–a very commendable mode of using a portion of leisure time.”

(See also The Intelligencer)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 190

Locations:  No issues located, but cited in the Deseret News,March 29, 1865

The Panguitch Register (UT, 1880-1884)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Panguitch, Garfield County, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: 1880-1884

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  John M. Dunning and JohnT. Daly, Sr.

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Cactus and/or, The Garfield County News, The Recorder, The Register

General Description and Notes:

Lucy Hatch of the Panguitch Daughters of Utah Pioneers read a paper on Dec. 29, 1932, “Ready Material of the Pioneers” which noted that:

The paper was first called the Cactus, but later the name was changed, some say to the Garfield County News, others say The Recorder, and some say the Register.”

“It was published from about 1880-1884.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:   Unknown

A Manuscript Paper (UT, 1893)

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A Manuscript Paper (UT, 1893)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hyrum, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 2, June 11, 1893

Size and Format:  Ledger (7 3/4 x 12+)

Editor/Publisher:  Clara Williams (Vol. 1, No. 2); “Written by the Y.M. & Y.L.M.I. Associations of Hyrum

Title Changes and Continuation:  See THE EDUCATOR, THE EVENINGSTAR, THE KNOWLEDGE SEEKER and YOUNG LADIES THOUGHTS; one of many papers published by the Young Men and Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Societies in Utah

General Description and Notes:

According to Alter, the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Associations of Hyrum published weekly literary journals largely in the interests and for the entertainment of their members during the late 1880s.  The publications carried news, religious items and weather reports.

“A Manuscript Paper” a jointly published by the young men and young ladies groups.  “The Knowledge Seeker” was published by the Young Men; “The Young Ladies Thoughts” and “The Evening Star” were published by the Young Ladies.  These papers appeared under various editors, since officers in these organizations changed hands regularly.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 90; Lorraine T. Washburn, “Culture in Dixie,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 29 (July 1961), 259-260; Mark A. Pendleton, “The Orderville United Order of Zion,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 7 (October 1939), 151

Locations:  John A. Israelson’s papers, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University, Logan, UT

The Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertiser (UT, 1867)

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Manti Herald (UT, 1867 )

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Manti, Sanpete County, Utah

Frequency:  Weekly; bi-weekly; irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No.1,Jan. 31, 1867-Vol.1, No. 15,May 18, 1867

Size and Format:  One page, legal size; three columns; large art masthead; pen and ink

Editor/Publisher:  F.C. Robinson, editor and publisher

Title Changes and Continuation:  Manti Herald (Jan. 31-Vol. 1, No. 5); Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertiser (Mar. 20-May 18, 1867)

Manti Herald (UT, 1867)

According to Alter, the Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertiser was all handwritten.  It carried display advertisements, local news and some telegraphic new briefs with a Salt Lake City date line.  Alter describes it as “a real newspaper in spirit and in fact, being the organ or propaganda of no one.”

The paper was issued to subscribers only.  Vol. 1, No. 2,Feb. 10, 1867 identifies editor Robinson as the Sanpete County Clerk.

In Number 6, March 20, 1867, the editor explained a publishing delay:

“To our subscribers:  We feel that an apology is due to our subscribers for the non-appearance of the Herald last week; and by way of explanation, may say that the ‘type’ we had previously used, proved defective, and we concluded to wait until we could get a fresh supply!”

Manti Herald (UT, 1867)

Number 7, March 30, 1867 carried the following story:

“Great Salt Lake City, March 22–I advise the brethren of Sanpete to keep their cattle where they will be safe, and not be out alone.–B. Young.”

Some issues with red lines and/or column rules

Information Sources:

Manti Herald (UT, `1867)

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 108-110; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969); Bob Karolevitz, “Pen and Ink Newspapers of the Old West,” Frontier Times, 44:2 (Feb.-March 1970), 30, 63-64;  Kate B. Carter (compiler), “Journalism in Pioneer Days Daughters of Utah Pioneers,” Historical Pamphlet, April 1943, p.143; Don A. Carpenter, “A Century of Journalism in Manti, Utah, 1867-1967,” unpublished M.A. Thesis, 1968, July.

Manti Herald (UT, 1867)

Locations:  Salt Lake City Public Library; front page, Vol. 1, No. 13, May 4, 1886, reproduced in Karolevitz (1970), 30.,  Mormon Archives (film) Ms d 7103 #1 and originals. [Note:  A bound set of the Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertisers are held in the safe, off periodicals, sub-basement, listed on old card catalog, not computer]

The Little Girls’ Magazine (UT, 1879)

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Little Girls Magazine (UT, 1879)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: St. George, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.1, No. 3, Nov. 12, 1879

Size and Format:  7.75 x 12.5 inches; one col.; pen and ink; 13 pp.

Editor/Publisher:  J.A. Ivins, editor (1879), on behalf of the Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association

Title Changes and Continuation:  Preceded by The Young Ladies Diadem

General Description and Notes:

The paper’s motto was “Perseverance conquers all things.”  The pages are filled with moralistic encouragement for young girls to have proper manners, to look for men who are moral and honest, to exercise their intellectual abilities (not to be idle), etc.

Several items are addressed “to the little girls of our association.”  Vol. 1, No. 3, includes two editorials, True Nobility, House-keeping, Kindness, Letters from Aunt Lou, Good Manners, Prayer, Cheerfulness, My Attendance at these meetings, To [sic] Late, and Cheerfulness at Home.

The stories appear to have been written by the young girls of the mutual improvement association and some of the elder women advisers.

Information Sources:               

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City, UT (Mss A 1052)

The Knowledge Seeker (UT, 1884)

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Knowledge Seeker (UT, 1884)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hyrum, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 4, No. 2, October 24, 1884, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 24, 1884

Size and Format:  Ledger (7 3/4 x 12+)

Editor/Publisher:  H.S. Allen (Vol. 4, No. 2); multiple authors, editors from the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association of Hyrum

Title Changes and Continuation:  See related publications, THE EDUCATOR, THE EVENING STAR, A MANUSCRIPT PAPER and YOUNG LADIES THOUGHTS; among the  many papers published by the Young Men and Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Societies in Utah

General Description and Notes:

According to Alter, the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Associations of Hyrum published weekly literary journals largely in the interests and for the entertainment of their members during the late 1880s.  The publications carried news, religious items and weather reports.

“The Knowledge Seeker” was published by the Young Men; “The Young Ladies Thoughts” and “The Evening Star” were published by the Young Ladies.  These papers appeared under various editors, since officers in these organizations changed regularly.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 90; Lorraine T. Washburn, “Culture in Dixie,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 29 (July 1961), 259-260; Mark A. Pendleton, “The Orderville United Order of Zion,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 7 (October 1939), 151.

Locations:  John A. Israelsen’s (1886-1965) papers, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University, Logan, U;  Mormon Archives, Salt Lake City, UT

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