Pony Gazette (MD, 1854-1856)

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PONY GAZETTE

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Baltimore, Maryland

Frequency:   Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  From 1854 (-56?)

Size and Format:  4-6 pages, roughly 8″ x 14″

Editor/Publisher:  Hook and Ladder Firemen’s Association

Title Changes and Continuation:

General Description and Notes:

The local organ of the Hook and Ladder volunteer fire company, handwritten on stock with a pre-printed masthead, in good condition and very legible. See also The Pickwickian, a New York Hook and Ladder Association’s handwritten paper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  The Hook and Ladder Company Collection (MS 662), Manuscripts, Maryland Historical Society,  Baltimore, MD

Politische Richter (WI, 1860)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Burlington, WI?

Frequency:  Likely weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Feb.-Apr.? 1860

Size and Format:  two pages of foolscap

Editor/Publisher:  Mathias Bachmayer

Title Changes and Continuation:  The exact title is uncertain; “Political Judge” is the translation.

General Description and Notes:

In German.  The paper is known only from mentions in the Burlington Gazette of March 20, 1860, ” . . . the paper is hand copied.  It is free and devoted to calling out the Catholic church building committee and local news.” and Apr. 4, 1860, “number twelve is received.  It covers two pages of foolscap.”  The exact title is uncertain; that given above is a translation from the English given in the Gazette.

Information Sources:         

Bibliography:  Burlington Gazette, March 20, 1860 and April 4, 1860; information from James P. Danky, Newspapers and Periodicals Librarian, The State Historical Society of Wisconsin, Madison, WI

Locations:  No copies are known.

Pleasant Hill Popgun (OR, 1901)

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Pleasant Hill Popgun (OR, 1901)

Place of Publication: Pleasant Hill, Oregon

Frequency:  One issue?

Volume and Issue Data:  No. 2, Dec. 13, 1901

Size and Format:  Ledger sheets, 14 pp.

Editor/Publisher:  Anonymous (Pleasant Hill Literary Society?)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Succeeded Rattlesnake Blizzard

General Description and Notes:

A handwritten newspaper on old ledger sheets, Dec. 13, 1901, in the same ledger as the earlier, Rattlesnake Blizzard, Dec. 30, 1885.  Edited anonymously.  Contained brief news items, jokes and anecdotes.

Page two contains the following:

“The Pop-gun is the paper of the people, by the people, and for the people; Now friends how can you stand back when you know what is best for U [sic].”

 The paper ends with this statement:

 “We desire to thank those who have so cheerfully contributed to these columns.  Without the aid of all the members it would be impossible for one to produce a piece of work such as the society will expect of their servants.  We have consigned nothing to the waste basket and have carefully looked over the almanacs and magazines in securing our material for this issue of the paper.  Now as we are about to step out we [sic] our successors a successful term and have a liberal patronage.  The present editors will hereafter be seen wandering about seeking lost health and long forgotten happiness.  Thanking you for the patronage we have enjoyed we now retire with the greatest of pleasure.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Martin Schmidt, Catalogues and Manuscripts, University of Oregon Library, Special Collections, Vol. I, 1971, item 888.

Locations:  Special Collections, Knight Library, University of Oregon, Eugene, Oregon

Plain Dealer (NJ, 1775-1776)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Potter’s Tavern, Bridgeton, Cumberland County, NJ

Frequency: Weekly, “every Tuesday morning”

Issue Data:  8 issues, December 21, 1775 through November 23, 1776.

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Ebenezer Elmer, 23, a native of Fairfield, NJ

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to the Cumberland County, NJ, history webpage,

“The Plain Dealer, the first newspaper established in New Jersey expressly for the purpose of supporting the sometimes faltering drive for American liberty, is one of the literary-political landmarks of the American Revolutionary period. The distinguished historian, John T. Cunningham, said that the fact that the Plain Dealer appeared every Tuesday morning probably made it New Jersey’s first regular “Newspaper.”

Potter’s Tavern, where the Plain Dealer was published is one of New Jersey’s most significant historical shrines.

“The editor of the Plain Dealer was Ebenezer Elmer, age 23, a native of Fairfield, a tea burner and a young physician who later distinguished himself as a soldier, a statesman and a public benefactor. He was the last survivor of Washington’s officers of the Jersey Continental Line. He was also the last original member of the New Jersey Society of the Cincinnati and at his death was the president of that mutual aid organization formed by the officers of Washington’s army when his troops were disbanded.

“Containing clear and persuasive argument in favor of Liberty from British domination, the Plain Dealer successfully served to crystallize sentiment in Cumberland County in favor of armed resistance. This accomplished, the editor and the contributors went off to war.

“The tavern bore the name of its licensed keeper, Matthew Potter. He was a brother of David Potter, who was later a Colonel in the Militia. Matthew’s place of entertainment was a gathering spot for the local firebrands. The fact that he gave a home to the Plain Dealer placed him in personal danger in the Revolutionary period. The silhouette on the cover of this booklet is the only likeness of Ebenezer Elmer so far identified.

“The original manuscript of the Plain Dealer was in the hands of Bridgeton owners who held it by inheritance. In the 1930’s it found its way into the streams of trade finally coming to rest in the Rare Book Collection of Rutgers, The State University.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography: “The Plain Dealer,” Cumberland County, NJ, history webpage

Locations:  Special Collections and Archives, Rutgers University Libraries, New Brunswick, NJ

The Plain Dealer (NC, 1857 or 1858)

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The Plain Dealer (NC, 1857 or 1858)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Wake Forest College, Winston-Salem, NC

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  No dates, but from dates found, it is from an issue of about 1857 or 1858.

Size and Format:  Only 2 pages remain–no cover page.

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Student?

General Description and Notes:

The Plain Dealer” was the forerunner of the “Student“.  Printing was done with a pen, very neatly, and very readable.

Information Sources:

The Plain Dealer (NC, 1857 or 1858)

Bibliography:  “A Leaf from the “Plain Dealer.”  The Wake Forest Student, April 1905, XXIV No. 7, pp.483-485.

Locations:  University Archives, Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC

The Pioneer Budget (MI, 1854)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Unknown

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1854

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Comstock, J. (?)

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Manuscript Holdings, Bentley Historical Library, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Pioneer Banner (FL, no date, ca. 1860s)

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PIONEER BANNER

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Barrancas (near Pensacola, now part of the U.S. Naval Air Station), FL

Frequency:  “semi-occasionally”

Volume and Issue Data: Unknown

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Young Confederates stationed at Fort Barrancas

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Civil war era.  Published for the young ladies of the Union Female College.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Bell Irvin Wiley, They Who Fought Here, NY:  Bonanza Books, 1959, p. 161.  See Secesh Eradicator also.

Links: Re. Fort Barrancas

Locations:  Unknown

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