The Pioneer Budget (MI, 1854)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Unknown

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1854

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Comstock, J. (?)

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Manuscript Holdings, Bentley Historical Library, The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

The Pioneer (NE, 1872)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Norfolk, Nebraska

Frequency:  Issued “semi-occasionally”

Volume and Issue Data: Jan. 17, 1872

Size and Format:  Two columns

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown?

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to the Federal Writers’ Project guide to Nebraska, The Pioneer was not sold for money, but traded for wheat, potatoes, minkskins, and eggs.  The front page carried Norfolk business “card” advertisements and poetry, with at least one titled, “Women Rights.”

Information Sources:                              

Bibliography:  Federal Writers’ Project, compilers, Nebraska:  A Guide to the Cornhusker State (New York:  The Viking Press, 1939), 134-135; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969), 111

Locations:  NB?; Reprint:  Federal Writers’ Project, compilers, Nebraska:  A Guide to the Cornhusker State (New York:  The Viking Press, 1939),135.

Pioneer (CA, 1856)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: North San Juan, California

Frequency:  Semi-monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  March-July 4, 1856; six issues

Size and Format:  “sheet of foolscap”

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Kennedy, the only newspaper at North San Juanwas a manuscript sheet called the Pioneer, which appeared in 1856.  Kennedy speculates that the paper may have been a humorous publication.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: Chester P. Kennedy, “Newspapers of the California Northern Mines, 1850-1860–A Record of Life, Letters and Culture,” unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford University, 1949, pp. 24-25, 39, 132, 289, 508-509, 511-512, 609

Locations:  Cu-B?

Pine Grove and Rockland Star (NV, 1872)

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See Pine Grove Burlesque

Pine Grove Chronicle (NV, 1872)

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See Pine Grove Burlesque

Pine Grove Burlesque (NV, 1872)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Pine Grove, Lyon County, Nevada

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  1872

Size and Format:  Written in a single bound volume

Editor/Publisher:  Pine Grove (and Rockland) Lyceum

Title Changes and Continuation:  Also titles of Esmeralda Sun, Pine Grove and Rockland Star, Pine Grove Chronicle, and Pick and Shovel.

General Description and Notes:

The lyceum members of Pine Grove, a mining camp in Lyon County, produced a manuscript newspaper containing literary items and local news in 1872.  Irregularly appearing as the Pine Grove BurlesqueEsmeralda Sun, Pine Grove and Rockland Star, Pine Grove Chronicle, and Pick and Shovel, the papers were written in a single bound journal and reportedly was kept on the counter of a general store owned by the Wilson family, (William Wilson make the initial gold discovery at Pine Grove), where local citizens could read it.

The bound journal records news of the Pine Grove-Rockland area at a time when neither community had a printed newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  “Pine Grove Lyceum Papers,” Nevada Historical Society Quarterly, XXIX: 3 (Fall 1985), pp. 221-222.

Locations:  Nevada Historical Society

Pick and Shovel (NV, 1872)

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See Pine Grove Burlesque

The Payson Advocate (UT, 1865)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Payson, Utah (ca. 1865)

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  At least 6 issues, ca. 1865

Size and Format:  Approx. 8 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown (also known as The Advocate)

General Description and Notes:

Alter quotes the Deseret News, March 29, 1865:

The Payson Advocate and The Intelligencer.  Manuscript newspapers, 8 pages each, judging from letters, and No. 6 of the Advocate, are proving interesting and beneficial to both writers and readers–a very commendable mode of using a portion of leisure time.”

(See also The Intelligencer)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 190

Locations:  No issues located, but cited in the Deseret News,March 29, 1865

Owl (CA, 1859)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: North Bloomfield, California (1859)

Frequency:  Only one issue known

Volume and Issue Data:  ca. February 1859

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None (see Miner’s News)

General Description and Notes:

According to Kennedy, North Bloomfield, a mining town on the South Fork of the Yuba River, did not have a printed newspaper in the 1850s, but the Hydraulic Press identified at least two manuscript papers, the Owl and the Miner’s News.

In the Feb. 5, 1859 issue of the Press, the editor reported that the Owl was North Bloomfield’s paper:

THE OWL.  This is the name of a manuscript paper published at North Bloomfield, and of which we have received a copy.  The owl was Minerva’s bird; but there is not much wisdom about this one.  We learn from its advertising columns that one gentleman holds all of the following positions:  Post Master, Express Agent, Justice of the Peace, Road Overseer, School Director, Gold Dust buyer and News Agent.  There’s honor for you.  Talk about republics being ungrateful.

B.P. Avery, editor of the Hydraulic Press, did not identify the editor or provide other details about the Owl.  No other references to the manuscript paper are known.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: ChesterB. Kennedy, “Newspapers of the California Northern Mines, 1850-1860–A Record of Life, Letters and Culture,” unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford University, 1949, pp. 25, 39, 511-12, 608

Locations:  None located, but cited in Hydraulic Press, Feb. 5, 1859

The Nugget (ZIM, 1890)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Victoria, Mashonaland, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia)

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: November 11, 1890

Size and Format: In manuscript; motto: “Root hog or bust”

Editor/Publisher: H.R. Vennell

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to the British South Africa Company Historical Catalogue and Souvenir of Rhodesia, Empire Exhibition, 1936-1937,

   “273. First Newspaper, Mashonaland. – The Nugget, with the motto Root hog or bust, produced in manuscript at Fort Victoria, 11th November, 1890 (two months after the occupation of Mashonaland). The Editor says frankly that his principal object was to be the first in the field of journalism in the country. Printed and published by H. R. Vennell at the Nugget Publishing Company’s works, Fort Victoria, Mashonaland. No price is mentioned.

– Government Archives, Salisbury”

Information Sources: 

Bibliography:  British South Africa Company Historical Catalogue and Souvenir of Rhodesia, Empire Exhibition, 1936-1937 (1937); Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 290; Press Reference-Zimbabwe; Louis W. Bolze, “The Book Publishing Scene in Zimbabwe,” The African Book Publishing Record, 6:3-4 (1980), 229–236

Locations:  None

Noilpum (CA, 1857-1858)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Hay Fork, Trinity County, California (ca. 1857-1858)

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Unknown

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown (Isaac Cox?)

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Kennedy notes that “except for a manuscript paper called the Noilpum, published at Hay Fork, all of Trinity County’s early newspapers were printed at Weaverville.  At most, only a very few copies may have been produced, and none are extant.

Isaac Cox reported in his history of Trinity County published in 1858,

We have named the “Noilpum” without spreading ourselves into explanatory easings, but now it comes.  It is the Hay Fork newspaper, an institution to absorb and assimilitate the literary exudations not otherwise provided for; a newspaper which, if presented to a Faust or Guttenberg of our day, would soon learn to know the “devil,” which again in all probability would cause relief in the tar and pitch market, the only operators in that commodity at present being the brokers of the squaw boudoirs.  The Noilpum is a goodly paper, and though it advocates the Administration in order not to hurt its books, would go dead downright for Jackson and Douglas in the question of “honest opinion.”   A paper is “ably” conducted, knowing nothing of Hoe and Co.’s Mammoth Cylinder, Anti-Friction, anti, etc. presses, or any other sleight-of-hand exponent of public greasing, being thus thrown back on pen and ink, will naturally get muddy and greasy enough to answer to the “mudsill” call and the pet name of printers’ cordiality, “dirty sheet.”  We may guess now you know what the “Noilpum” is.

Kennedy speculates that the Noilpum may have been a humorous paper (despite the lame attempt at humor above).

Information Sources:                        

Bibliography:  Isaac Cox, The Annals of Trinity County (San Francisco:  Commercial Book and Job Steam Printing, 1858), 125;  Chester P. Kennedy, “Newspapers of the California Northern Mines, 1850-1860–A Record of Life, Letters and Culture,” unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford, 1949, pp. 30-31, 39, 289, 574-75, and 603)

Locations:  None located

The New Moon (MO, 1842)

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The New Moon, MO, 1842

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Jefferson City or Arrow Rock, MO

Frequency: Unknown (one issue?)

Volume and Issue Data: February 23, 1842

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

According to the Missouri Historical Society, “The New Moon was a mock newspaper sent to Miss Missouri I. Ewing of Jefferson City, MO, from an unknown ‘publisher.’  A unique issue, it provides an entertaining news account of an excursion from Jefferson City to a point new [sic] Arrow Rock, MO, for a country wedding.

According to Jolliffe and Whitehouse, The New Moon “was probably not a continuing, circulated publication”  and “it appears that the entire issue satirizes a single event–a wedding.” They conclude that the paper was “a single copy of an amusing feminist newsletter.”

Information Sources:                           

Bibliography: Lee Jolliffe and Virginia Whitehouse, “Handwritten Newspapers on the Frontier? The Prevalence Problem, ” paper presented at the AEJMC History Division Mid-Year Meeting, Columbia, MO, 1994.

Locations:  Edwards Family Papers, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO

Mount Idaho Radiator (ID, 1873)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Mount Idaho (Grangeville), Idaho

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Feb. 1873

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Kenneth L. Robison, “Idaho Territorial Newspapers,” unpublished M.S. thesis, University of Oregon, 1966

Citations: “The Mount Idaho Radiator.” Idaho Signal [Lewiston, Idaho] 8 Mar. 1873: n.p. Nineteenth Century U.S. Newspapers. Web accessed: 7 Sept. 2015.URL: http://find.galegroup.com/dvnw/infomark.do?&source=gale&prodId=DVNW&userGroupName=acd_dvnw&tabID=T003&docPage=article&docId=GT3015499776&type=multipage&contentSet=LTO&version=1.0; Gale Document Number: GT3015499776

Locations:  None

Moscow Argus (ID, 1878-1879)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Moscow, Idaho (1878-1879)

Frequency:  Quarterly?

Volume and Issue Data:  At least one issue during the winter of 1878-1879

Size and Format:  Unknown?

Editor/Publisher:  R.H. Barton, G.P. Richardson and Dr. William Taylor (1878-1879)

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to An Illustrated History of North Idaho, the Moscow Argus was the first paper in Latah County, Idaho. “It was published in the winter of 1878-79 by the Moscow Literary Society and its editors were R.H. Barton, George P. Richardson, and Dr. William Taylor. They had no printing press, so the paper was written out by hand and was read at regular weekly meetings of the society.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Bert Cross,”History of Moscow’s Newspapers,” in Moscow Centennial edition, Idahonian; Kenneth L. Robison, “Idaho Territorial Newspapers,” unpublished M.S. thesis, University of Oregon, 1966; An Illustrated History of North Idaho Containing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai, and Shoshone Counties (Western Historical Publishing Co., 1903) p. 1219.

Locations:  None

Melbourne Advertiser (AUS, 1838)

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Melbourne Advertiser (AUS, 1838)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Port Phillip, Melbourne, SE Australia

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  January 1, 1838, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-17 extant (minus No. 16); first 10 issues were handwritten

Size and Format:  Four pages,  two columns (see images on State Library of Victoria website)

Editor/Publisher:  John Pascoe Fawkner

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Earliest paper in Southeast Australia

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 23

Locations:  State Library of Victoria, Australia (images online)

Mashonaland and Zambesian Times (ZIM, 1891-1892)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Salisbury, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia)

Frequency: Weekly for 62 weeks

Volume and Issue Data: June 1891; weekly circulation: 180 copies

Size and Format: Pen and ink and then replicated by “cyclostyle” or early stenograph “for the Argus company”

Editor/Publisher: William Ernest Fairbridge

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to several sources, the Mashonaland and Zambesian Times, a hand-written paper described by one journalist as a “crude but readable cyclostyled sheet,” was published for 62 weeks from June 1891 into 1892. On October 20, 1892, The Rhodesia Herald replaced the Mashonaland and Zambesian Times as the country’s major daily newspaper. That paper, since renamed The Herald , survives today as Zimbabwe’s oldest and largest circulation daily newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 290; Press Reference-Zimbabwe; Louis W. Bolze, “The Book Publishing Scene in Zimbabwe,” The African Book Publishing Record, 6:3-4 (1980), 229–236

Locations:  None

Little Joker (TX, 1866-1869)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Jacksboro, Texas

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Published sometime between 1866 and 1869.

Size and Format:  On foolscap

Editor/Publisher:  H.H. McConnell

Title Changes and Continuation:  Same editor/publisher produced the BIG INJUN at Fort Belknap,Texas and THE GRASSHOPPER at Fort Buffalo, Texas.

General Description and Notes:

According to Whisenhunt, the Jacksboro area had no fewer than four newspapers between 1866 and 1869, although only one was printed.  The editor of all four was H.H. McConnell, a soldier first assigned to Jacksboro, Texas in 1866.  McConnell recounts his journalistic efforts and military experience on the Texas frontier in the Reconstruction period in his autobiography, Five Years a Cavalryman.

Shortly after he arrived in Jacksboro, McConnell and other soldiers published a weekly newspaper, LITTLE JOKER, on foolscap.  The paper circulated among the soldiers at Jacksboro.  The Jacksboro post was temporarily abandoned by the military, and the LITTLE JOKER “was ignominiously packed on a Quartermaster’s house and moved to Fort Belknap.”

At Fort Belknap soon issued another handwritten paper, BIG INJUN, intended for a military audience.  According to McConnell, “Here the genius of the editor again broke forth, and the ‘Big Injun’ for a time shed an undying lustre on the literature of the nineteenth century.”  The paper was short-lived:  “Like a meteor flashing along the midnight sky–brilliant for a moment, then rendering the darkness more intense–so the ‘Big Injun’ ran its course.”

McConnell’s transfer to nearby Fort Buffalo Springs marked the publication of his third handwritten, THE GRASSHOPPER.  Like its predecessors, THE GRASSHOPPER was short-lived.  Fort Buffalo Springs was soon abandoned for the more strategic Jacksboro post.

McConnell was finally reassigned to Fort Richardson where he contracted with a Weatherford,Tex.printer to publish The Flea.  This, his first printed newspaper, appeared Feb. 1, 1869, but lasted only six issues, until June 15, 1869.

According the Whisenut, McConnell’s handwritten papers did little more than provide diversion for the soldiers at their respective military posts, but “this was important.  Their very existence also implies that the life of the frontier soldier was mostly a monotonous existence despite the legend and aura of romance that surrounds the United States Cavalry.”

Information Sources:                   

Bibliography:  H.H. McConnell, Five Years a Cavalryman (Jacksboro, Texas:  J.N. Rogers and Co., 1889), p. 174; Donald W. Whisenhunt, “The Frontier Newspaper:  A Guide to Society and Culture,” Journalism Quarterly, 45:4 (Winter 1968), 727; see also Theronne Thompson, “Fort Buffalo Springs, Texas, Border Post,” West Texas Historical Association Yearbook, 36:168 (October 1960).

Location:  None

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

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Litte Joker (SK, 1888 )

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Battleford, Saskatchewan, Canada

Frequency:

Volume and Issue Data:  Twelve issues; June-Dec. 1888

Size and Format:  11 x 17 inches

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Saskatchewan Archives Board has 70 pp. of this manuscript newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Saskatchewan Archives Board, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

Litte Joker (SK, 1888)

Little Joker (SK, )

Little Joker (SK, 1888)

Le Californien (CA, 1850)

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Le Californien (CA, 1850)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: San Francisco, California

Frequency:  Weekly, began January 17,1850, ceased in Feb? 1850.

Volume and Issue Data: January 31, 1850, No. 3.

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

In French.  Lithographed due to lack of proper type for French language.  The librarian could not locate the original, but they are supposed to have it.

Information Sources:                

Bibliography:  Wall, Alexander J. “Early Newspapers,” New-York Historical Society Quarterly, V. 15, N. 2 (July 1931).

Locations: Newspaper Collection, New York Historical Society, New York, NY

The Intelligencer (UT, ca. 1865)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Payson, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Ca. 1865

Size and Format:  Approx. eight pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Alter quotes the Deseret News, March 29, 1865:

The Payson Advocate and The Intelligencer.  Manuscript newspapers, 8 pages each, judging from letters, and No. 6 of the Advocate, are proving interesting and beneficial to both writers and readers–a very commendable mode of using a portion of leisure time.”

(See THE PAYSON ADVOCATE)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism  (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 190.

Locations:  No issues located, but cited in the Deseret News, March 29, 1865

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