The (Carolina) Rebel (SC, 1863)

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The (Carolina) Rebel (SC, 1863)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Columbia, SC

Frequency:  Unknown (monthly?)

Volume and Issue Data:  Two extant copies: Vol. 1, No. 1, January 28, 1863; Vol. 1, No. 4, April 23, 1863

Size and Format:  Four pages

Editor/Publisher:  “Liliput”

Title Changes and Continuation:  No. 1 is titled The Rebel; No. 4 is titled The Carolina Rebel (though the first column says, “The Rebel, published at Columbia, So Ca, Whenever the Editor is in the right mood by Liliput, Editor and Proprietor.”

The (Carolina) Rebel (SC, 1863)

General Description and Notes:

Although The Rebel was produced during the middle of the Civil War (No. 4 was written four months after the Emancipation Proclamation and just days before the Southern Army’s victory at Chancellorsville), the editor makes only minimal references to the conflict. Page four of the April issue has a brief report on the war gathered during the editor’s trip to Charleston. Most of the stories deal with domestic matters (teaching children, food prices, first year of marriage, etc.). This suggests that the paper was most likely the editorial work of a young woman.

According to the South Carolina Historical Society catalog, the Rebel is a “Handwritten newspaper (4 p.). ‘Vol. 1, No.1, published at Columbia, So. Ca., whenever the Editor is in the right mood.’ Includes humorous articles, letters to the editor, articles concerning Confederate officers and officials, and advertisements for ‘T.H. Egan, Portrait Painter’ and others.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Short article in The South Carolina Historical Magazine (1963), page unknown; “The Rebel: A Handwritten 1863 Columbia Newspaper,” Carologue: A Publication of the South Carolina Historical Society, 9:1 (Spring 1993 ), pp. 14-18.

Locations:  Both extant copies are held by the South Carolina Historical Society, Charleston, SC: Vol. 1, No. 1, is part of the manuscript collection donated by P.W. Gruenwald: The Rebel, 1863 Jan. 28. (43/435) ; No. 4 is in the Balzano Collection.

The Phoenix (MA, no date)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Unknown

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  36 issues

Size and Format:  30-60 pages per issue

Editor/Publisher:  Dunham Family

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

A family project, including writings and illustrations by adults and children.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Dunham Family Papers,  Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, Northampton, MA

Our Port Folio (NJ, 1865-1885)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Lake Hopatcong, NJ, Public School

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1865-1885

Size and Format:  22 pages

Editor/Publisher:  “The young ladies of the public school in district no. 4.”

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

“The young ladies of the public school in district no. 4.” It is faintly written, in pencil or badly faded ink.

Information Sources:               

Bibliography: None

Locations:  New Jersey Historical Society, Newark, NJ

Our Home (MA, 1848)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Unknown

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1848

Size and Format:  Approximately 15 pp.

Editor/Publisher:  Harriet Kellogg, age 20

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Amateur newspaper located in the Dunham Family Papers at Smith College.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Dunham Family Papers, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College, Northampton, MA

The Nutshell (MA, no date)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: East Marshfield, MA

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: Unknown

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  American Antiquarian Society,  Worcester, MA

The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (MI, 1827)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager (No. 4, Jan. 12, 1827-No. 11, ? 1827); The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager (No. 12, March 2, 1827); The Literary Voyager (No. 13, March 10, 1827-No. 14, April 11, 1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (No. 16, April 28, 1827)

Size and Format:  Averaged 23 pages per issue

Editor/Publisher:  Henry Rowe Schoolcraft (1826-1827)

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun, or Literary Voyager (1827); The Muz-ze-ni-e-gun and Literary Voyager (1827); The Literary Voyager (1827); The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager (1827); also cited as Schoolcraft’s First Literary Magazine

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, The Muzzinyegun or Literary Voyager was a manuscript magazine devoted to the life, history, customs, tribal news of the Ojibwa Indians, as well as poetry, essays and information on western living and Mexican civilization.  This was the second of editor Schoolcraft’s three handwritten publications, the first being a literary magazine published from 1809 to 1818, and the third being The Bow and Arrow (1833).  The magazine circulated in Sault Ste. Marie, Detroit, New York and elsewhere.

Articles and other content were usually written by Schoolcraft and his wife.  Objiwa lore content was supplied by Mrs. Schoolcraft’s brother George Johnston and their mother, the daughter of Waub Ojeeg, a Ojibwa leader.  The reports published in The Muzzinyegun provided a basis for Schoolcraft’s later ethnological studies printed in Historical and Statistical Information Respecting the History, Conditions, and Prospects of the indian Tribes of the United States (6 vols.; Philadelphia:  Lippincott, Grambo and Co., 1851-1857).

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Vernon Kinietz, “Schoolcraft’s Manuscript Magazines,”  Bibliographical Society of America Papers, 35 (April-June, 1941), 151-154; Philip P. Mason, “Introduction” and Notes, The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962); Philip P. Mason, ed., The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962); David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 265-266

Locations:  DLC; Danky and Hady; Reprint:  Philip P. Mason, ed., The Literary Voyager or Muzzeniegun (East Lansing:  Michigan State University Press, 1962)

The Mill Valley News (CA, 1893)

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Mill Valley News (CA, 1893)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Mill Valley, California

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, April 6, 1893

Size and Format:  Four pages; 6 1/2 x 8 1/4; three columns

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Front page contents include a “Poet’s Corner” (with poems by Kezia B. Simmes, and Elizabeth Stone), a short story on “True Love” by Madge Wilson; page two has news “Notes” which mention a new hotel being “nearly finished” and the Catholic Church, “it is hoped be dedicated on the first of May” and will “accommodate about 200 people,” an essay on “Rob White” by Chas. Fromley; page three is mostly “The Little Ones, A Fairy Tale” by Jessy Greot and short joke about Jonah and the Whale; and page four contains jokes, births, lists marriages and deaths, but leaves those blank, puzzles, and a “Letter Box” with two short letters and mention of thanks yous to seven individuals.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Anne Kent California History Room, Marin County Free Library, CA (photocopy)

A Manuscript Paper (UT, 1893)

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A Manuscript Paper (UT, 1893)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hyrum, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 2, June 11, 1893

Size and Format:  Ledger (7 3/4 x 12+)

Editor/Publisher:  Clara Williams (Vol. 1, No. 2); “Written by the Y.M. & Y.L.M.I. Associations of Hyrum

Title Changes and Continuation:  See THE EDUCATOR, THE EVENINGSTAR, THE KNOWLEDGE SEEKER and YOUNG LADIES THOUGHTS; one of many papers published by the Young Men and Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Societies in Utah

General Description and Notes:

According to Alter, the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Associations of Hyrum published weekly literary journals largely in the interests and for the entertainment of their members during the late 1880s.  The publications carried news, religious items and weather reports.

“A Manuscript Paper” a jointly published by the young men and young ladies groups.  “The Knowledge Seeker” was published by the Young Men; “The Young Ladies Thoughts” and “The Evening Star” were published by the Young Ladies.  These papers appeared under various editors, since officers in these organizations changed hands regularly.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 90; Lorraine T. Washburn, “Culture in Dixie,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 29 (July 1961), 259-260; Mark A. Pendleton, “The Orderville United Order of Zion,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 7 (October 1939), 151

Locations:  John A. Israelson’s papers, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University, Logan, UT

The Little Girls’ Magazine (UT, 1879)

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Little Girls Magazine (UT, 1879)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: St. George, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.1, No. 3, Nov. 12, 1879

Size and Format:  7.75 x 12.5 inches; one col.; pen and ink; 13 pp.

Editor/Publisher:  J.A. Ivins, editor (1879), on behalf of the Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Association

Title Changes and Continuation:  Preceded by The Young Ladies Diadem

General Description and Notes:

The paper’s motto was “Perseverance conquers all things.”  The pages are filled with moralistic encouragement for young girls to have proper manners, to look for men who are moral and honest, to exercise their intellectual abilities (not to be idle), etc.

Several items are addressed “to the little girls of our association.”  Vol. 1, No. 3, includes two editorials, True Nobility, House-keeping, Kindness, Letters from Aunt Lou, Good Manners, Prayer, Cheerfulness, My Attendance at these meetings, To [sic] Late, and Cheerfulness at Home.

The stories appear to have been written by the young girls of the mutual improvement association and some of the elder women advisers.

Information Sources:               

Bibliography:  None

Locations: Utah State Historical Society, Salt Lake City, UT (Mss A 1052)

The Leasure Hour (NC, 1866,1869)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Harrington, North Carolina (Cumberland County, now known as Harnett County)

Frequency:  The 1866 issue says monthly.

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. l, No 1, October 1866; and Vol. I, No. 1, May 1869, and No. 2, June 1869.

Size and Format:   The 1866 copy is 8 1/2″ x 5 1/2; all are 4 pp. each

Editor/Publisher:  “Harrington & Co.” for the first one and Sion A. Harrington (postmaster at Harrington, NC, in 1851) for the other two.

Title Changes and Continuation:  Same title but Vol. 1 appears in 1866 and again in 1869.

General Description and Notes:

Contains verses, essays, and miscellany.  The 1866 issue is described as “crudely printed”.  The other two look as if they may be drafts prepared for publication, but no published copies have been found.

According to Michael Ray Smith, ” Sion A. Harrington, John’s younger brother, printed at least one known copy of a handwritten newspaper called the Weekly News on February 2, 1869, and two issues of The Leasure Hour, a monthly publication, in May and June 1869″ (Free Press in Freehand, p. 70).

Information Sources:                   

Bibliography: Michael Ray Smith, Free Press in Freehand (Grand Rapids, MI: Edenridge Press, 2011)

Locations:   The 1866 paper is in the North Carolina room (C050), and the other two (Accession No. 3341) are in the Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Manuscripts Department,  Chapel Hill, NC

La Mignionette (IL, 1840)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Monticello College, Godfrey, Illinois

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1840, vol. I, No. 7 and submissions

Size and Format:  43 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Possibly later known as “Cobwebs”, 1862.  Both are publications of Monticello College.

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Monticello College Records (Box 9),  Manuscripts, Illinois State Historical Library, Old State Capitol, Springfield, IL

The Knowledge Seeker (UT, 1884)

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Knowledge Seeker (UT, 1884)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hyrum, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 4, No. 2, October 24, 1884, Vol. 4, No. 2, October 24, 1884

Size and Format:  Ledger (7 3/4 x 12+)

Editor/Publisher:  H.S. Allen (Vol. 4, No. 2); multiple authors, editors from the Young Men’s Mutual Improvement Association of Hyrum

Title Changes and Continuation:  See related publications, THE EDUCATOR, THE EVENING STAR, A MANUSCRIPT PAPER and YOUNG LADIES THOUGHTS; among the  many papers published by the Young Men and Young Ladies Mutual Improvement Societies in Utah

General Description and Notes:

According to Alter, the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Associations of Hyrum published weekly literary journals largely in the interests and for the entertainment of their members during the late 1880s.  The publications carried news, religious items and weather reports.

“The Knowledge Seeker” was published by the Young Men; “The Young Ladies Thoughts” and “The Evening Star” were published by the Young Ladies.  These papers appeared under various editors, since officers in these organizations changed regularly.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 90; Lorraine T. Washburn, “Culture in Dixie,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 29 (July 1961), 259-260; Mark A. Pendleton, “The Orderville United Order of Zion,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 7 (October 1939), 151.

Locations:  John A. Israelsen’s (1886-1965) papers, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University, Logan, U;  Mormon Archives, Salt Lake City, UT

The Kentucky Spy and Porcupine Quill (KY, 1849)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  January 1849

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Link:  American Antiquarian Society, Amateur Newspapers, Kentucky

Locations:  American Antiquarian Society, Worcester, MA

The Intelligencer (UT, 1865)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Parowan, Utah

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.1 No.3, Feb 11, 1865; Vol.1,  No.4, Feb. 18, 1865; Vol.1, No.6, March 4, 1865

Size and Format:  8”x12”, 2 columns

Editor/Publisher:  Joseph Fish, William Davenport, H.S. Coombs

Title Changes and Continuation:

General Description and Notes:

Motto:  “Thought is the Mind’s Wealth”

The Intelligencer is published every Saturday morning by the young men of Parowan, Utah.

Terms:  Read and return to editor.

Advertisements free

Poetry, lit. stories, Religion, ads, city council news, letter to the editor

(p.2-3, No.4) The editors of the Intelligencer had thought of changing the name of this sheet, but upon more mature deliberation, they think it best to continue the original title.  To those shoe were present at the spelling school and saw The Hesperian Sentinal this may serve as an explanation of the change.

Alter, p.189:  Parowan, Iron County, S. Utah:  “The Intelligencer, a pen and ink manuscript newspaper comes to life for a single glance through a reference by editor Stenhouse of the Salt Lake Daily Telegraph, Saturday morning, April 16, 1865.

“Our Southern contemporary, that unpretending sheet, the Intelligencer, published by the Young Men of Parowan, comes to our table as regularly as the Southern mail will admit. It contains articles upon education and other matters worthy of perusal.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 190

Locations:  Mormon Church Archives (M5d5824), Salt Lake City, UT;  Cited in the Desert News, March 29, 1865

Honey Bee (OR, 1874)

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Honey Bee (OR, no date)

Place of Publication: Jacksonville, Oregon

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1, 1874

Size and Format:  10 pp. Ledger-size lined paper, written in cursive ink

Editor/Publisher:  Annie Miller

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

“Devoted to Art, Wit, Poetry, and Science” (cover page)

Motto: “Onward and Upward.”

From the “Editorial” on page 2 (see image below): “With this issue we  bring before the public the first No. of the Honey-Bee, edited by the Young Ladies of the Independant (sic) Literary Society. ”  The editor continues, ” . . . having had no experience whatever in the Newspaper business, we ask the kind indulgence of our friends, should we not meet their most sanguine expectations.”

Honey Bee (OR, 1874)

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Special Collections, University of Oregon Library, Eugene, OR

Home Writer (UT, 1881-1883)

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Home Writer (UT, 1881-1883)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Manti, Utah

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  13 numbers:  Vol. 1, No. 2 December 6, 1881, through Vol. 2, No.13 December 3, 1883.

Size and Format:  8”x12.5” ledger-size lined pages, written in ink

Editor/Publisher:  S.A. Parsons, Olive Lowry, Charles Tennant, Ettie C. Kyar, A.S. Squire, T. Parry, R.L. Byleu, Nephi Gledhill, Nancy Westenskow, J.J. Hansen

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Motto:  Representing the Young Men and Young Ladies M.I. [Mutual Improvement] Association of Manti.

Includes editorials, hints on criticism, good thoughts, how to ? knowledge, wit and humor, mathematical problems, answers to problems, poetry, news, advertisements, births, deaths, marriages, etc.

Information Sources:

Home Writer (UT, 1881-1883)

Bibliography:  George T. Brooks Papers, Box 1 Fd. 2-4

Locations:  University Libraries, Manuscripts, University of Utah, Ms 368

The Family News (PA, 1902-1906)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Haverford, Pennsylvania?

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1902-1906

Size and Format:  352 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Christopher Morley (1890-1957)

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Morley produced four other newspapers, all contained in the Morley Collection at Haverford.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Haverford College, The Quaker Collection, Haverford, PA

The Evening Star (UT, 1884-1891)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Hyrum, Cache County, Utah (ca. 1884-1891)

Frequency:  Weekly

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 4, Oct. 18, 1884 (“Knowledge Seeker”);  copies of varied title papers run to 1891

Size and Format:  Legal size; six to 10 pages; pen and ink

Editor/Publisher:  Various editors; Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Associations of Hyrum

Title Changes and Continuation:  See The Educator, The Knowledge Seeker; A Manuscript Paper; Young Ladies’ Thoughts

General Description & Notes:

According to Alter, the Young Men’s and Young Ladies’ Mutual Improvement Associations of Hyrum published weekly literary journals largely in the interests and for the entertainment of their members during the late 1880s.  The publications carried news, religious items and weather reports.

“The Knowledge Seeker” was published by the Young Men; “The Young Ladies Thoughts” and “The Evening Star” were published by the Young Ladies.  Apparently, “The Evening Star” succeeded “The Knowledge Seeker.”  These papers appeared under various editors, since officers in these organizations changed hands regularly.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 90; Lorraine T. Washburn, “Culture in Dixie,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 29 (July 1961), 259-260; Mark A. Pendleton, “The Orderville United Order of Zion,” Utah Historical Quarterly, 7 (October 1939), 151

Locations:  John A. Israelson’s papers, Special Collections and Archives, Utah State University, Logan, UT

The Casket (MA, 1857)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Boylston, Massachusetts

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1857

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Amateur Newspaper, written with pen or pencil.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Link: The American Antiquarian Society, Amateur Newspapers Collection

Locations:   American Antiquarian Society, Worcester,  MA

The Belmont Star (AB, 1889-1890)

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Belmont AB Star (AB, 1889)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Belmont School, Belmont, AB Canada

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Issues published in February 1889 to May 1890

Size and Format:  Variable

Editor/Publisher:  Albert Fraser, Simon Borwick, et al.

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Star

General Description and Notes:

According to an Edmonton city website, The Star was a handwritten newspaper put together by students of the Belmont School and teacher, James Bond Steele.  The Edmonton Archives have three editions of the newspaper, February 1889, March 1889 and May 1890.  Here is a scan and transcription of the introduction of the first edition:

StarIntroductionv3

The Belmont Star (AB, 1889)

The Belmont Star
Albert Fraser – Editor-in-Chief
Belmont, Alta., Feb’y, 1889

The Star

We present to-day the first number of the Belmont Star. It is started for the instruction [and]amusement of the pupils of Belmont[School]. All the news and other matter in the Star will be made up by the scholars. The school-house was put up in 1882, and the first teacher was Mr. Murphy. The old pupils generally leave in the spring, or at hay-making time, because there is more work then than any other time. Some of them stop a week or two in the autumn. New scholars generally begin in spring or summer. There were a few of the scholars sick for a while. Some didn’t go to school for two weeks; some for about a week. There were five examinations, one in 1885, one in 1886, one in 1887, and two in 1888.

And a transcription of the local news (pictured above):

Local News
Simon Borwick – – Editor

Robins were singing in town on March 2nd.

Henry J. Fraser saw a band of ducks on March 1st.

Rain fell on the 27th of February.

Eggs are 33 1/3 c a dozen, and butter is 40 c a pound.

The weather was fine all the month, with the exception of one week.

There are cracks in the ground 4 5/8 inches wide, and three feet deep.

Prairie fires are raging and have done some damage. Mr. Stedman had his house burnt, and others have lost a good deal of hay.

This has been a very open winter. The coldest day was Friday, Feb’y 22nd. It was 28 degrees below zero.

Some of the pupils were sick in school lately. Others were forced to make some sudden trips outside on account of their noses bleeding.

The ice is melting on the lakes.

Mr. William Rowland’s team ran away on the 26th.

The air has been very smoky lately.

Harry Fulton left scho[ol] on the 1st instant.

The Ducks

The ducks come early in the spring to lay their eggs. They lay them in a bush or by a lake. After she hatches her eggs she loses her feathers and can’t fly till in September. Then all the ducks begin to fly around the country. In the fall they go home to another country and stay till the next spring.

___ Henry J. Fraser

(City of Edmonton Archives volunteer Kathryn Merrett transcribed the Belmont Star stories above.)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Link: http://www.transformingedmonton.ca/index.php/2011/04/20/belmont-school-newspaper-the-star-part-i/

Locations:  Edmonton Archives, Edmonton, AB, Canada

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