La Critique (MA, 1829)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Amherst College, Massachusetts

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1829, Vol. 1, nos. 2, 3, 4, 5

Size and Format:  16 pp. total

Editor/Publisher: Amherst College Students

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Publications holdings, Archives and Special Collections, Amherst College Library, Amherst, MA

The Institute Ledger (IL, 1858)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Batavia Institute, Illinois

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 2, March 30, 1858

Size and Format:  20 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Affiliated with the Batavia Institute.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Manuscripts (SC 2006), Illinois State Historical Library, Old State Capitol, Springfield, IL

Halaquah Times (OK, 1871-1875)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Wyandotte Mission School, Last Creek, Indian Territory (Oklahoma)

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 2, No. 3-Vol. 6, No. 6, ca. 1871-1875

Size and Format:  (check extant copies–at Kansas collection)

Editor/Publisher:  Ida Johnson and Julia Robitaille, editors; Halaquah, Literary Society of Wyandotte Mission School (1871-1875)

Title Changes and Continuations:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to Littlefield and Parins, the Halaquah Times was a manuscript magazine published by the students of the Wyandote Mission’s literary society.  It contained letters and essays on student and school activities.  Many of the essays focused on “social improvement.”  The magazine was edited by Ida Johnson and her associate July Robitaille.

According to Murphy and Murphy, the student editors made one copy and then had other students at the mission school make additional copies.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 (Norman:  University of Oklahoma Press, 1936); Grace Ernestine Ray, Early Oklahoma Newspapers (Norman:  University of Oklahoma Press, 1928); James E. Murphy and Sharon M. Murphy, Let My People Know:  American Indian Journalism, 1828-1978 (Norman:  University, 1981); David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 143-144.

Locations:  “Miscellaneous–Halaquah,” Manuscripts, Kansas State Historical Society, contains two undated issues, written in copybooks

Evening Star (IL, 1857)

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Publication History: 

Place of Publication: Wheaton, Illinois

Frequency:   Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, no. 3

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Student Lyceum League (later known as the Beltionian Literary Society), Wheaton College

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Illinois’ oldest literary society.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Special Collections, Wheaton College, Wheaton, IL

The Eskimo Bulletin (AK, 1893-1902?)

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Eskimo Bulletin (AK, 1893, 1902)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Cape Prince of Wales, A.M.A. Mission School, Alaska (1893, 1902)

Frequency:  Annual? “Only Yearly in the World”

Volume and Issue Data:  March 24, 1893-Vol. 5, May, 1902?

Size and Format:  7 1/4 x 10 3/4 inches; some handwritten and mimeographed, some printed

Editor/Publisher:  W.T. Lopp (1894-1902); Oo-ten-na, Eskimo engraver; Kiok, I-ya-tunk-uk and Ad-loo-at, compositors; American Missionary Association Mission School

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description & Notes:

See image

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  James Wickersham, A Bibliography of Alaska Literature, 1724-1924 (Cordova, Ak.:  Cordova Daily Times Print, 1927), 258

Links: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn96060045/

Locations:  AkAU, AkU, CaACUAI, IdU, UkCU-Pa

English Chips (RI, 1858)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Providence High School, Rhode Island

Frequency:  Annually?

Volume and Issue Data:  1858, three issues, about 12 pages total.

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Gardner and Stone

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Providence High School literary newspaper

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Manuscripts, The Rhode Island Historical Society, Library, Providence, RI

The Creek Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly (OK, 1870-1875)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Tullahassee Manual Labor School, Creek Nation, Wagoner County, Indian Territory (Oklahoma) (1870-1875)

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  The Creek Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly (Vol. 1, No. 1, Dec. 1870-Vol. 1, No. 5, April 27, 1871); Our Monthly (Vol. 2, No. 1, Jan. 1873-Vol. 4, No. 10, Oct. 1875); may have run as late as 1876

Size and Format:  Two columns, published in both Creek and English languages

Editor/Publisher:  William S. Robertson and Ann Augusta Robertson (1870-1875)

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Creek Boys’ and Girls’ Monthly (1870-1871); Our Monthly (1873-1875?)

General Description and Notes:

The first volume (1870-1872) of the small, two-column monthly appeared only in manuscript.  Later issues were printed on a hand press donated by Creek National Council.

The Rev. William S. Roberston, a Presbyterian missionary associated with the Tullahassee school since 1850, assisted by his daughter Ann Augusta, edited contributions mostly from Creek student exercises.  The purpose of the paper was “the moral and intellectual improvement” of the students, and to “give the Creeks parts of the Bible and religious songs in their own language.”  In addition to student work, the Robertsons solicited writings from any Creeks who were interested in the school or its publications.  The monthly’s manuscript editions were received so well by the community that the Creek National Council provided funds to purchase a printing press and appropriated $100 annually to cover printing 1,000 copies per issue a year.  Copies were distributed free in the Creek Nation.  Our Monthly first appeared in print in Jan. 1873.

The paper was published in both Creek and English, with many issues almost entirely in Creek.  Ann Eliza Robertson translated some articles, scripture passages and hymns into Creek while others were written by Creeks.

In addition to general news about the Creek nation and education matters, the paper also published political commentary.  For example, an 1875 Creek letter called for the repeal of the Treaty of 1866, which gave railroads a claim to Indian land.  Local advertising and local news also appeared.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Althea Bass, The Story of Tullahassee (Oklahoma City:  Semco Color Press, 1960); Carolyn Thomas Foreman, Oklahoma Imprints, 1835-1907 (Norman:  University of Oklahoma Press, 1936);  James Constantine Pilling, Bibliography of the Muskhogean Languages (Washington, D.C.:  Government Printing Office, 1889); James E. Murphy and Sharon M. Murphy, Let My People Know:  American Indian Journalism, 1828-1978 (Norman:  University, 1981), 59; David F. Littlefield, Jr. and James W. Parins,  American Indian and Alaska Native Newspapers and Periodicals, 1826-1924 (Westport, Conn.:  Greenwood Press, 1984), 293-296.

Locations:  Danky and Hady; OkMu; OkTu; ULS

Cool Spring Pen (NC, 1878-?)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Cool Spring, Iredell, North Carolina

Frequency: Unknown; published “every once in a while.”

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 8, 1878)-18??

Size and Format:  Pen and ink journal

Editor/Publisher:  E. Walter McIver

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

“Published at the Cool Spring Academy in [sic] behalf of the Cool Spring Debating Society and education generally.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Links: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn99061547/

Locations: North Carolina Division of Archives and History, Raleigh, NC

Cobwebs (IL, 1862)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Monticello College, Godfrey, Illinois

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1862

Size and Format:  14 pages

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Perhaps formerly known as “La Mignionette“, 1840, also a publication of Monticello College.

General Description and Notes:

None

Information Sources:

Bibliography:

Locations:  Monticello College Records, Box 9, Manuscripts, Illinois State Historical Library, Old State Capitol, Springfield, IL

The Club (UT, 1872)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Lehi City, Utah

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1 No. 2,  December 13, 1872

Size and Format:  16”x25”:  four lined sheets of 8”x12.5” pasted together (4×6 piece posted in the lower right corner front.  4 columns written on both sides

Editor/Publisher:  The Thurmond brohers of J.E. Ross

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description & Notes:

“Devoted to choice literature and amusements.”

[Page 1] Reminiscences:  [Editorial Policy] “In our last number we published a short editorial setting fourth [sic] the great and fundamental principasl upon which this paper is based.  Our object as the great and universal good of mankind, the total abolishment of every prinicple that is opposed to justice, truth and honor; to train the immortal mind of man that he may walk in paths of purity.  These are the great purposes for which we devote our labors, our time and our money

“Our motto is perserverence, unceasing diligence will achieve great results and though we stand lone in thes arduous struggle for reformation, still our columns will flooded with immortal principals [sic] and precepts that will discern as a legacy to succeeding generations, . . . “

Conatins:  poetry, local and other matters, letter to the editor, thank you “to the girls that prepared our room for the meeting last Wednesdayevening and also this evening.”

According to Hamilton Gardner, (224) Lehi YMMIA was founded in 1875. Primary association was established in 1878.  (418) John E. Ross came to Lehi in 1840, taught school for 29 years and secondary school for 25 years.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Hamilton Gardner, History of Lehi, SLC, The Deseret News, 1913.

Locations: Mormon Church Archives, Salt Lake City, UT

The Casket (NE, 1875)

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The Casket (NE, 1875)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Prospect Hill School (District 75), Waverly, Lancaster County, Nebraska

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol.1, No. 1, Jan. 22, 1875

Vol. 1, No. 2, Feb. 19, 1875

Vol. 1, No. 3, March 19, 1875

Size and Format:  Ledger paper, 7.75 x 12 inches; pen and ink; 2 cols.

Editor/Publisher:  Students, including Charles A. Pierce

Title Changes and Continuations:  See THE EXPERIMENT and WILLOW CREEK JOURNAL may have been precursors to The Casket

General Description & Notes:

The Casket contains short news items, editorials anecdotes and student “compositions.”  The weather apparently was of concern in all three extant numbers because of a bitter cold spell.

The editorial in the first number explains the circumstances of the new publication:

We come into your presence this afternoon, to make our first bow, in the editorial line, and hope that you will take our paper.  When it was announced, a couple of weeks ago, that “our school” was to have a paper, many were the disheartening exclamations, and hints that it would be a second rate sort of thing, if it did come out.

The Casket (NE, 1875)

We were not discouraged, however, for we had confidence in our contributors; but we were surprised by the number of articles which came pouring in.  Instead of our first number being a four or eight page paper, as we expected; we are enabled to issue a first class sixteen-page one, which we know exceeds the expectations of any of us.  Our motto is “Excelisor,” as you may see, and we will try to improve with every number, instead of retrograding, as some papers do.  As a last word, we ask you to keep on supporting use, as you did have this time, and we will soon be able to challenge any paper of this kind in the state, to excel us.

One of the student editors, Charles A. Pierce, was the son of Charles W. Pierce, a civil war veteran, who was transferred to Demopolis, Alabama in 1866 as a major with the Freedman’s Bureau and District commander of western Alabama.  The senior Pierce served one term in the 41st Congress from Alabama’s fourth district in 1867.  I was during this time that his son, Charles A., began his first handwritten newspaper, THE EXPERIMENT, at Oakland Hall, Chunchula, Alabama.  In 1872 the family moved to Waverly, Nebraska, where THE EXPERIMENT, and its successor, WILLOW CREEK JOURNAL were published by Charles A in 1873.  THE CASKET appeared in Nebraska in 1875 as a school effort, no doubt with the help of Charles A.

The Casket (NE, 1875)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Nebraska State Historical Society, State Archives, Lincoln, NB, Charles Pierce papers, Ms. 554

The Blister (PA, 1921-1927)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Gettysburg, PA

Frequency: “Created almost every day when school was in session”

Volume and Issue Data: November 5, 1921-March 29, 1927

Size and Format: Single typewritten and hand-illustrated page

Editor/Publisher: Variable

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

The Blister, PA, 1922

General Description & Notes:

Note from Gettysburg College Special Collections Librarian David Hedrick (to HNP editor, June 22, 1993):

The Blister was created almost every day when school was in session. The Blister consisted of a single typewritten page usually containing an ‘Editorial’, some campus news, a couple of jokes, and a hand-drawn cartoon. It seems that only a limited number of copies of each issue were created and at least one copy was always posted on a campus bulletin-board. An almost complete run is maintained in our collections . . . . This publication has been microfilmed, and can be acquired via interlibrary loan.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: Charles Glatfelter, A Salutary Influence: Gettysburg College, 1832-1985 (Gettysburg, 1987).

Locations: Musselman Library, Special Collections, Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, PA

The Black Fly (MI, 1913-1915)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Douglas Lake, Michigan

Frequency: Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  July and August, 1913-1915

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Student surveyors at surveying camp, Douglas Lake, Michigan

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description & Notes:

This paper is listed as a “printed holding”, but may still be relevant–perhaps it is partial manuscript.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Floyd Streeter, Michigan Bibliography (Michigan Historical Commission, 1921), p. 42 (entry 380):

The black fly, v. 2-4. Camp Davis, Mich., 1913-1915. U.
Published irregularly during July and August at the University of Michigan surveying camp at Douglas Lake, Mich.”

Locations:  Bentley Historical Library, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

The Belmont Star (AB, 1889-1890)

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Belmont AB Star (AB, 1889)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Belmont School, Belmont, AB Canada

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Issues published in February 1889 to May 1890

Size and Format:  Variable

Editor/Publisher:  Albert Fraser, Simon Borwick, et al.

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Star

General Description and Notes:

According to an Edmonton city website, The Star was a handwritten newspaper put together by students of the Belmont School and teacher, James Bond Steele.  The Edmonton Archives have three editions of the newspaper, February 1889, March 1889 and May 1890.  Here is a scan and transcription of the introduction of the first edition:

StarIntroductionv3

The Belmont Star (AB, 1889)

The Belmont Star
Albert Fraser – Editor-in-Chief
Belmont, Alta., Feb’y, 1889

The Star

We present to-day the first number of the Belmont Star. It is started for the instruction [and]amusement of the pupils of Belmont[School]. All the news and other matter in the Star will be made up by the scholars. The school-house was put up in 1882, and the first teacher was Mr. Murphy. The old pupils generally leave in the spring, or at hay-making time, because there is more work then than any other time. Some of them stop a week or two in the autumn. New scholars generally begin in spring or summer. There were a few of the scholars sick for a while. Some didn’t go to school for two weeks; some for about a week. There were five examinations, one in 1885, one in 1886, one in 1887, and two in 1888.

And a transcription of the local news (pictured above):

Local News
Simon Borwick – – Editor

Robins were singing in town on March 2nd.

Henry J. Fraser saw a band of ducks on March 1st.

Rain fell on the 27th of February.

Eggs are 33 1/3 c a dozen, and butter is 40 c a pound.

The weather was fine all the month, with the exception of one week.

There are cracks in the ground 4 5/8 inches wide, and three feet deep.

Prairie fires are raging and have done some damage. Mr. Stedman had his house burnt, and others have lost a good deal of hay.

This has been a very open winter. The coldest day was Friday, Feb’y 22nd. It was 28 degrees below zero.

Some of the pupils were sick in school lately. Others were forced to make some sudden trips outside on account of their noses bleeding.

The ice is melting on the lakes.

Mr. William Rowland’s team ran away on the 26th.

The air has been very smoky lately.

Harry Fulton left scho[ol] on the 1st instant.

The Ducks

The ducks come early in the spring to lay their eggs. They lay them in a bush or by a lake. After she hatches her eggs she loses her feathers and can’t fly till in September. Then all the ducks begin to fly around the country. In the fall they go home to another country and stay till the next spring.

___ Henry J. Fraser

(City of Edmonton Archives volunteer Kathryn Merrett transcribed the Belmont Star stories above.)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Link: http://www.transformingedmonton.ca/index.php/2011/04/20/belmont-school-newspaper-the-star-part-i/

Locations:  Edmonton Archives, Edmonton, AB, Canada

Alexandrian Eclectic Review (MA, 1831)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Amherst College, Amherst Massachusetts

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1831 vol. 1, no.4

Size and Format:  2 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

Student paper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Amherst College Library Archives, Special Collections, Amherst College, Amherst, MA.

The Advocate (ID, 1879)

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The Advocate (ID, 1879)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Placerville, Granite Creek, Boise City, Baker City and Idaho City, Idaho

Frequency:   Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  May 16, 1879

Size and Format:  8 x 13 inches; one column

Editor/Publisher:  Thomas Haney, editor and manager; other editors listed on title page from respective towns (see below); P.D. Rothwell, teacher

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown

General Description & Notes:

This school newspaper consisted of a series of student essays.  It is unclear how the paper was organized or produced, but several student editors from various towns in southern Idaho apparently contributed materials of their own or from students residing in these locales.

The title page-cover is illustrated with a series of nine circles, each filled with the names of the editors/authors, or place names.  The motto of the paper reads, “What is Noble in Man, What is Lovely in Woman.”

The editors from the different schools represented are identified on the title-front page inside circles drawings:

Boise City Editors: Carrie Cartio, Ella Cartio, James Allington, M.B. Givinns(?), A.H. Redway
Placerville Editors: H(?) O’Brien
Baker City Editors: E.L. Sturjill, L.M. Sturjill, J.F. James, Fanny White, M.M. Robbins, A.B. Carter
Idaho City Editors (L): E.A. Kingsley, Lena Broadbeck, Anna G. Galbraith, John P. Barry, Peniel French, Emma Bright
Idaho City Editors (R): Gage Lewis, W.S. Galbraith, Frank McGuinness, Nellie Davis, Jn. E. Craig, A.G. Galbraith (2nd), E.A. Kingsley (2nd).

In one extant essay, “Our School,” a student author notes that the school had desks for 13 students.  The building is described as “very old” and “very dirty.”  “This school house is a very dirty one, the more you scrub it the dirtier it looks.” Even the stove was deemed “very old.”  Despite that, Hannora Halley, the author of the essay, writes “I would rather go to school than to stay home.” She does not identify the locations of her school or home.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Library and Archives, Idaho State Historical Society, Boise, ID

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