Pine Grove and Rockland Star (NV, 1872)

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Pine Grove Chronicle (NV, 1872)

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See Pine Grove Burlesque

Pine Grove Burlesque (NV, 1872)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Pine Grove, Lyon County, Nevada

Frequency:  Irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  1872

Size and Format:  Written in a single bound volume

Editor/Publisher:  Pine Grove (and Rockland) Lyceum

Title Changes and Continuation:  Also titles of Esmeralda Sun, Pine Grove and Rockland Star, Pine Grove Chronicle, and Pick and Shovel.

General Description and Notes:

The lyceum members of Pine Grove, a mining camp in Lyon County, produced a manuscript newspaper containing literary items and local news in 1872.  Irregularly appearing as the Pine Grove BurlesqueEsmeralda Sun, Pine Grove and Rockland Star, Pine Grove Chronicle, and Pick and Shovel, the papers were written in a single bound journal and reportedly was kept on the counter of a general store owned by the Wilson family, (William Wilson make the initial gold discovery at Pine Grove), where local citizens could read it.

The bound journal records news of the Pine Grove-Rockland area at a time when neither community had a printed newspaper.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  “Pine Grove Lyceum Papers,” Nevada Historical Society Quarterly, XXIX: 3 (Fall 1985), pp. 221-222.

Locations:  Nevada Historical Society

The Payson Advocate (UT, 1865)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Payson, Utah (ca. 1865)

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  At least 6 issues, ca. 1865

Size and Format:  Approx. 8 pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation:  Unknown (also known as The Advocate)

General Description and Notes:

Alter quotes the Deseret News, March 29, 1865:

The Payson Advocate and The Intelligencer.  Manuscript newspapers, 8 pages each, judging from letters, and No. 6 of the Advocate, are proving interesting and beneficial to both writers and readers–a very commendable mode of using a portion of leisure time.”

(See also The Intelligencer)

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 190

Locations:  No issues located, but cited in the Deseret News,March 29, 1865

The Panguitch Register (UT, 1880-1884)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Panguitch, Garfield County, Utah

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: 1880-1884

Size and Format:  Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  John M. Dunning and JohnT. Daly, Sr.

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Cactus and/or, The Garfield County News, The Recorder, The Register

General Description and Notes:

Lucy Hatch of the Panguitch Daughters of Utah Pioneers read a paper on Dec. 29, 1932, “Ready Material of the Pioneers” which noted that:

The paper was first called the Cactus, but later the name was changed, some say to the Garfield County News, others say The Recorder, and some say the Register.”

“It was published from about 1880-1884.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:   Unknown

The Nugget (ZIM, 1890)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Fort Victoria, Mashonaland, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia)

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: November 11, 1890

Size and Format: In manuscript; motto: “Root hog or bust”

Editor/Publisher: H.R. Vennell

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

According to the British South Africa Company Historical Catalogue and Souvenir of Rhodesia, Empire Exhibition, 1936-1937,

   “273. First Newspaper, Mashonaland. – The Nugget, with the motto Root hog or bust, produced in manuscript at Fort Victoria, 11th November, 1890 (two months after the occupation of Mashonaland). The Editor says frankly that his principal object was to be the first in the field of journalism in the country. Printed and published by H. R. Vennell at the Nugget Publishing Company’s works, Fort Victoria, Mashonaland. No price is mentioned.

– Government Archives, Salisbury”

Information Sources: 

Bibliography:  British South Africa Company Historical Catalogue and Souvenir of Rhodesia, Empire Exhibition, 1936-1937 (1937); Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 290; Press Reference-Zimbabwe; Louis W. Bolze, “The Book Publishing Scene in Zimbabwe,” The African Book Publishing Record, 6:3-4 (1980), 229–236

Locations:  None

The Nation. (NC, 1858)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Buffalo Springs, North Carolina

Frequency: Weekly

Volume and Issue Data: According to Smith, 21 numbers (16 issues surviving) Saturdays, beginning, April 17, 1858, and then Wednesdays, June 23, 1858 until September 8, 1858.

Size and Format: About 9 x 11 inches

Editor/Publisher: John McLean Harrington

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:      

According to Smith, The Nation. contained traditional newspaper content but concentrated on the politics of the Democrats. Occasionally Harrington called it The Nation. and used a period in the name.

The Nation, whose motto was “The majority must rule; the minority must submit,” contains verses, essays, an announcement of a Democratic party meeting, an advertising rates chart, and miscellany written by John McLean Harrington. In the first issue, Harrington, who would have been about 19 years old at the time, declares his political partisanship by announcing that The Nation will be “strictly Democratic” (p. 4).

Other John McLean Harrington papers include:

  • The Young American (January-December, 1858), 12 issues
  • The Weekly Eagle (April 20, 1860), 1 issue
  • Semi-Weekly News (July 20, 1860-August 13, 1860), 6 issues
  • The Weekly News’ Advertising Sheet Monthly (February-April, 1860) 3 issues
  • The Weekly News (June 1860-March 1864), 182 issues
  • The Times (October 1867-April 1869)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: Michael Ray Smith, Free Press, Free Hand (Grand Rapids, MI: Edenridge Press, 2011). Additional bibliographic information about this and other Harrington papers in Smith.

Link:  Free Press in Freehand: The Spirit of American Blogging in the Handwritten Newspapers of John McLean Harrington 1858-1869

Locations: John McLean Harrington Papers, Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Perkins Library, Duke University, Durham, NC

Moscow Argus (ID, 1878-1879)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Moscow, Idaho (1878-1879)

Frequency:  Quarterly?

Volume and Issue Data:  At least one issue during the winter of 1878-1879

Size and Format:  Unknown?

Editor/Publisher:  R.H. Barton, G.P. Richardson and Dr. William Taylor (1878-1879)

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

According to An Illustrated History of North Idaho, the Moscow Argus was the first paper in Latah County, Idaho. “It was published in the winter of 1878-79 by the Moscow Literary Society and its editors were R.H. Barton, George P. Richardson, and Dr. William Taylor. They had no printing press, so the paper was written out by hand and was read at regular weekly meetings of the society.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Bert Cross,”History of Moscow’s Newspapers,” in Moscow Centennial edition, Idahonian; Kenneth L. Robison, “Idaho Territorial Newspapers,” unpublished M.S. thesis, University of Oregon, 1966; An Illustrated History of North Idaho Containing Nez Perce, Idaho, Latah, Kootenai, and Shoshone Counties (Western Historical Publishing Co., 1903) p. 1219.

Locations:  None

The Monthly Meteor (MA, 1881)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Worcester, MA

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol 1. No.1  December 1881

Size and Format:  28 pages including wrappers

Editor/Publisher:  John Green Oliver

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Found in a scrapbook kept by John Green Oliver of Worcester, MA from 1874-1882, newspapers of other members of the New England Amateur Journalists’s Association, along with other memorabilia of his press activities, “all in meticulous emulation of professional job printing and the fraternal culture thereof.”

The Monthly Meteor is printed by hectography with holograph touch-ups and is thus partially handwritten, and is certainly a hand-made facsimile of a manuscript original.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Rare Book Room, Smith College, William Allan Neilson Library, Northampton, MA

The Mill Valley News (CA, 1893)

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Mill Valley News (CA, 1893)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Mill Valley, California

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No. 1, April 6, 1893

Size and Format:  Four pages; 6 1/2 x 8 1/4; three columns

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Front page contents include a “Poet’s Corner” (with poems by Kezia B. Simmes, and Elizabeth Stone), a short story on “True Love” by Madge Wilson; page two has news “Notes” which mention a new hotel being “nearly finished” and the Catholic Church, “it is hoped be dedicated on the first of May” and will “accommodate about 200 people,” an essay on “Rob White” by Chas. Fromley; page three is mostly “The Little Ones, A Fairy Tale” by Jessy Greot and short joke about Jonah and the Whale; and page four contains jokes, births, lists marriages and deaths, but leaves those blank, puzzles, and a “Letter Box” with two short letters and mention of thanks yous to seven individuals.

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations:  Anne Kent California History Room, Marin County Free Library, CA (photocopy)

Melbourne Advertiser (AUS, 1838)

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Melbourne Advertiser (AUS, 1838)

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Port Phillip, Melbourne, SE Australia

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  January 1, 1838, Vol. 1, Nos. 1-17 extant (minus No. 16); first 10 issues were handwritten

Size and Format:  Four pages,  two columns (see images on State Library of Victoria website)

Editor/Publisher:  John Pascoe Fawkner

Title Changes and Continuation:  None

General Description and Notes:

Earliest paper in Southeast Australia

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Jerry Don Vann, Rosemary T. VanArsdel, Periodicals of Queen Victoria’s Empire: An Exploration (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1996), p. 23

Locations:  State Library of Victoria, Australia (images online)

The Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertiser (UT, 1867)

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Manti Herald (UT, 1867 )

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Manti, Sanpete County, Utah

Frequency:  Weekly; bi-weekly; irregular

Volume and Issue Data:  Vol. 1, No.1,Jan. 31, 1867-Vol.1, No. 15,May 18, 1867

Size and Format:  One page, legal size; three columns; large art masthead; pen and ink

Editor/Publisher:  F.C. Robinson, editor and publisher

Title Changes and Continuation:  Manti Herald (Jan. 31-Vol. 1, No. 5); Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertiser (Mar. 20-May 18, 1867)

Manti Herald (UT, 1867)

According to Alter, the Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertiser was all handwritten.  It carried display advertisements, local news and some telegraphic new briefs with a Salt Lake City date line.  Alter describes it as “a real newspaper in spirit and in fact, being the organ or propaganda of no one.”

The paper was issued to subscribers only.  Vol. 1, No. 2,Feb. 10, 1867 identifies editor Robinson as the Sanpete County Clerk.

In Number 6, March 20, 1867, the editor explained a publishing delay:

“To our subscribers:  We feel that an apology is due to our subscribers for the non-appearance of the Herald last week; and by way of explanation, may say that the ‘type’ we had previously used, proved defective, and we concluded to wait until we could get a fresh supply!”

Manti Herald (UT, 1867)

Number 7, March 30, 1867 carried the following story:

“Great Salt Lake City, March 22–I advise the brethren of Sanpete to keep their cattle where they will be safe, and not be out alone.–B. Young.”

Some issues with red lines and/or column rules

Information Sources:

Manti Herald (UT, `1867)

Bibliography:  J. Cecil Alter, Early Utah Journalism (Salt Lake City:  Utah State Historical Society, 1938), 108-110; Robert F. Karolevitz, Newspapering in the Old West:  A Pictorial History of Journalism and Printing on the Frontier (New York:  Bonanza Books, 1969); Bob Karolevitz, “Pen and Ink Newspapers of the Old West,” Frontier Times, 44:2 (Feb.-March 1970), 30, 63-64;  Kate B. Carter (compiler), “Journalism in Pioneer Days Daughters of Utah Pioneers,” Historical Pamphlet, April 1943, p.143; Don A. Carpenter, “A Century of Journalism in Manti, Utah, 1867-1967,” unpublished M.A. Thesis, 1968, July.

Manti Herald (UT, 1867)

Locations:  Salt Lake City Public Library; front page, Vol. 1, No. 13, May 4, 1886, reproduced in Karolevitz (1970), 30.,  Mormon Archives (film) Ms d 7103 #1 and originals. [Note:  A bound set of the Manti Herald and Sanpete Advertisers are held in the safe, off periodicals, sub-basement, listed on old card catalog, not computer]

The Little Printing Press (AK, 1953-1957)

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The Little Printing Press (AK, 1953-1957)

Place of Publication: Nome, Alaska

Frequency:  Unknown, 64 issues

Volume and Issue Data: July 15, 1953-July1957

Size and Format:  Handwritten and typed

Editor/Publisher:  Pamela Mandeville Mulvihill (eight years old)

Title Changes and Continuation:  The Little Newsprint

General Description and Notes:

According to the editor in notes written in 1975, The Little Newsprint was begun by Pamela Mandeville Mulvihill in Nome when she was eight years old.  Her mother, Ellen Mulvihill, did the typing and the ran the ditto machine.  Her mother committed the error in the title by changing the name to The Little Printing Press after the first issue.  Pamela did all the writing and dictated to her mother what she should type, including spelling.

The paper appeared irregularly for 64 issues untill about July, 1957.  The reason for starting the paper “has been forgotten,” but the author claims it was an “instant success.”

The Little Printing Press (AK, 1953-1957)

According to Mulvihill, she sold 100 copies for 1 cent each.  I never took tips.  After the paper had been typed and run off the night before (usually very late after many discussions over the news), she would attach her coin changer to her belt and go to main street early Saturday morning.  There was a regular route through various stores and offices which were her regular customers.  The drug store took several which they resold.

She had several regular subscribers throughout Alaska and a few “outside.”  Delegate Bob Bartlett was an occasional reader.  Out of towners were charged only the cost of the paper plus postage–5 cents at the time.  Ads were five cents.  News was collected by simply being a girl growing up in Nome; “I just kept my ears open!” (PMM, Dec. 16, 1975)

Information Sources:

Bibliography: None

Locations: Alaska State Library

Light Wood Knot Herald and Daily Expositor (SC, 1837-1838)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Light Wood Knot, S.C. (near Columbia)

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1837-1838

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Martha Warrington Nutting Stratton (1814-1890), Jacob Levin, Thomas Seibels

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

 “A facetious newspaper containing parodies, humorous news articles, poems, advertisements, obituaries, and sketches.”  Light Wood Knot Springs was located near Columbia and was frequented by planters and their families.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  South Caroliniana Library, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC

Lake Peak News (NV, 1906)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Walker Lake Reservation, Nevada

Frequency:  Unknown

Volume and Issue Data: Oct. 29, 1906, only known issue reported

Size and Format:  Four pages

Editor/Publisher:  Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

A story in the Reno Nevada State Journal, of Oct. 31, 1906, p. 5, under the headline, “First Newspaper is ‘Printed’ with Pencil,” states:

“The first newspaper published in the newly opened Walker Lake reservation has come into the hands of the Journal.  It is a curiosity.  Four pages constitute its dimensions and it is written with a pencil.  It is called the Lake Peak News.  The principal article, the “lead,” written under date of October 29 [1906], concerns a townsite already laid out and called Lake Peak.

“Prospectors report,” says the article, “that thirty claims have been staked out at Lake Peak in the porphyry hills.  it is estimated that 2400 men made the dash into the reservation today.  One hundred from Cat Creek, near Hawthorne, 500 from Montella, 200 from Bald Mountain, 150 from Buck Brush, 100 from Schurz, 50 from Thorne and neighboring hills, 150 from Hawthorne and 400 from miscellaneous points.”

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Cited in Reno, Nevada State Journal, Wed., Oct. 31, 1906, p.5; reprinted in Fallon Churchill Standard, Nov. 10, 1906.

Locations: Unknown

Knight’s Newspaper [Exact Title Unknown] (ME, 1858)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Cape Elizabeth (?), Maine

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  One issue, dated Dec. 6, 1858

Size and Format: Unknown

Editor/Publisher:  Thomas E. Knight

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

A Thomas E. Knight, who may have been the editor of this paper, was a ship builder and “selectman” in Cape Elizabeth, Maine, in the mid-19th century. He was involved with at least two legislative petitions in 1852 to (1) raise money to purchase a Portland, ME, bridge, and (2) deal with some sort of dispute between the city of Cape Elizabeth and a Randall Skilling.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Maine-Augustus

The Juggernaut (MO, 1930-1933)

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Publication History:

Place of Publication: Springfield, Missouri

Frequency:  Monthly

Volume and Issue Data:  Three extant issues: October 20, 1930; March 5, 1932; October 5, 1933.

Size and Format:  Round-robin family newspaper

Editor/Publisher:  The Wright family

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

Circulated among friends and relatives in Mount Vernon, IL, Chicago, and St. Louis.  Included family news, humor, and commentary.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations:  Ruth Wright Collection, Missouri Historical Society Archives, St. Louis, MO

Hazelton Queek (BC, 1880-1881)

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Hazelton Queek (BC, 1881)

Publication History:

Place of Publication: Hazelton (Caledonia?), British Columbia, Canada

Frequency: Unknown

Volume and Issue Data:  1880-1881

Size and Format: Unknown (see image)

Editor/Publisher: Unknown

Title Changes and Continuation: Unknown

General Description and Notes:

A typewritten memo with the Queek in the BC Archives by Mrs. H.K. Andrews (or “Miss Woods”, whose name is scratched out) reads,

“In the year 1880, I went North with my brother to stay with our people the Tomlinsons. My brother to assist in farm and agricultural work which Mr. Tomlinson the missionary was starting, to help the Indians improve their mode of life. And had settled a little place called Ankihtlast–about 150 miles from the Coast and 20 miles from Hazelton, near the head of Navigation on the Skeena. I went to try and help my sister with the children (four in number). In the year of 80 & 81 Bp. and Mrs. Ridley having been sent by the C.F.S. to be head of the Missions were living at what we called ‘The Forks’ (the junction of the Bulkley and Skeena), now I believe called Old Hazelton. Wishing to do all possible to help the whites, Mrs. Ridley started what she called pleasant evenings on every Tuesday and her house was open house specially for the men who came out from Omineca. An evening of readings, music and general social intercourse.  This social evening developed into a desire for a weekly paper, both the Bp. and Mrs. R. were talented & had taken many sketches locally. Mrs. R. and I going out together, sketching up the Haguilket Valley. There was no news coming in for the winter months from the outside world, we were absolutely cut off till spring would come. So everyone was expected to help in gathering items of interest, a riddle, a story, anything. My brother sent weather readings from our mission station. I contributed a few sketches, for our paper was an illustrated one, and we looked forward to receiving it on Saturday. The Bp. wrote out and transferred it on a gelatine press, sufficient numbers for the regular customers–about 10 or 12 I suppose; the Hankins, ourselves, & the miners. “

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  None

Locations: British Columbia Archives and Records Services, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

Esmeralda Sun (NV, 1872)

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The Denial Bay Starter (Australia, 1908)

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The Denial Bay Starter, Australia, 1908

Publication History:

Place of Publication:  Denial Bay Township, Australia (west side of Eyre Peninsula, 500 miles from Adelaide)

Frequency:  “Weekly”

Volume and Issue Data:  November 14, 1908 (first issue) through 1909

Size and Format:  Early editions were three columns. After the New Year, 1909, it went to two columns.

Editor/Publisher: Dr. C.T. Abbott (with Mrs. Abbott, assistant production officer and general press hand”) [Alan Finch, Pens & Ems]

Title Changes and Continuation: None

General Description and Notes:

In his history of Australian journalism, Alan Finch describes The Denial Bay Starter as “produced in a violent mauve ink on a hectograph in atrocious handwriting.” According to Finch, the first editorial, or leading article, explained the anonymous editor’s goals for the publication:

“Dear friends, this obscene sheet is only started with the intention of amusing you and gathering for your perusal any little items of news that may be brought to our notice. We do not wish to enter into the arguments that arise from burning questions of the hour, but will try to plainly set before you both the good and the bad points of any discussion. We should be willing to inscribe any letter or correspondence that the public may forward to us . . . we do not wish to hurt anyone’s feelings but if we inadvertently do so please tell us and we will strive to make atonement in every possible way.”

The editor went on to explain the title of the new paper: “. . . this is a starter and we hope to see in the near future a type printed paper which will bring the West Coast more prominently before the public than it has been hitherto.”

The paper was issued each Saturday, but the editor remained anonymous until shortly after the New Year 1909, when the editor’s name was included at the top of the paper: Dr. C.T. Abbott, a medical doctor and relative newcomer to the area.

Number 20 was produced with the aid of  a typewriter and duplicating stencil.

In the January 29, 1910 edition, the editor announced the paper’s retirement:

“The time has come, when the Starter will retire from the arena, and cease to exist. But we hope that this year old infant, has been able to bring other thought and ideas to your minds, than you had previously, that it had been able to sow on rich ground, a few seeds which in the future will spring up. “

The editor, Dr. Abbott, brought the paper to an end because he moved to a new position at Pine Creek.

Information Sources:

Bibliography:  Alan Finch, Pens & Ems in Australia: Stories of Australian Newspapers (Adelaide, 1965), pp. 12-18.

Locations: Public Library, Adelaide, Australia; National Library, Canberra, Australia

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